Kenneth Nebenzahl, Jr., Lectures in the History of Cartography | Newberry

Kenneth Nebenzahl, Jr., Lectures in the History of Cartography

Sebastiao Lopes Atlas. Ayer MS Map 26, folio 22r

Sebastiao Lopes Atlas. Ayer MS Map 26, folio 22r

The Kenneth Nebenzahl, Jr., Lectures in the History of Cartography are held at the Newberry every two to three years. Since 1966, the lectures have been dedicated to exploring promising new themes and lines of research in the study of the science, art, and culture of mapmaking. Each series consists of several lectures given by a small group of invited scholars whose work addresses the theme of that year’s series. The collected lectures of most series have been published by the University of Chicago Press.

The lectures are made possible by the generous support of Ken and Jossy Nebenzahl, in memory of their son. They are free and open to the public; however, registration is required.

November 7-9, 2019, the Newberry will host the 20th Kenneth Nebenzahl, Jr., Lectures on the topic of 1919 and the history of cartography. 1919 was a year of heightened map production around the world. These maps reflect the instability and the idealistic experimentation of a world attempting to solve the problems that had led to four years of devastating war. Some cartographers worked to preserve a lasting peace with their maps, while others redrew national boundaries, seeking what some maps had taught them was rightfully theirs. While much of this cartographic work took place at the peace negotiations in Paris in 1919, its global legacy reverberates today, a century later. Nine scholars from around the world will address and investigate the ramifications of 1919 on the history of cartography.

Past Nebenzahl Lectures

Upcoming Lectures

Thursday, November 7, 2019Saturday, November 9, 2019
Center for the History of Cartography Programs
Free and open to the public. Registration required.
1919 was a year of heightened map production around the world. These maps reflect the instability and the idealistic experimentation of a world attempting to solve the problems that had led to four years of devastating war.