D'Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies | Newberry

D'Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies

D'Arcy McNickle. Ayer Modern MS McNickle Box 34 Fl. 290.

D’Arcy McNickle. Ayer Modern MS McNickle Box 34 Fl. 290.

The D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies was founded in 1972. Its goals are to encourage the use of the Newberry collections in these areas of study; improve the quality of what is written about American Indians and Indigenous peoples; educate teachers about American Indian and Indigenous cultures, histories, and literatures; assist American Indian tribal and Indigenous historians in their research; and provide a meeting ground where scholars, teachers, tribal historians, and others can discuss their work with each other. See our core collection page on American Indian and Indigenous Studies for an introduction to using the Newberry’s rich collection of American Indian and indigenous materials.

The McNickle Center’s staff, affiliated research projects, and fellows have played a major role in shaping modern scholarship on American Indian and Indigenous studies. The long- and short-term fellows have produced nearly forty books and dozens of scholarly articles over the last two decades. The center sponsors conferences, seminars, and workshops for scholars and teachers, and administers several fellowships. It is also home to the Newberry Consortium in American Indian and Indigenous Studies (NCAIS).

Contact the center’s Staff for more information.

Dr. Rose Miron will be the next Director of the D’Arcy McNickle Center for American Indian and Indigenous Studies, beginning July 8, 2019. Dr. Miron comes to the Newberry from the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition in Minneapolis, where she worked closely with tribal leaders to develop programs aimed at further understanding, addressing, and raising awareness about the inter-generational trauma resulting from experiences at U.S. Indian boarding schools. She recently completed her Ph.D. at the University of Minnesota, and her scholarly work focuses on how Native peoples use tribal archives to claim authority over the creation, assembly, and use of their historical materials.

The Newberry Library is located on the lands of American Indians, who have persisted longer than the United States has been a nation. We acknowledge that Potawatomi, Odawa, Sauk, Ojibwe, Illinois, Kickapoo (Kiikaapoi), Miami (Myaamia), Mascouten, Wea, Delaware, Winnebago, Menominee, and Mesquakie villages resided and traded along Lake Michigan’s shoreline from precontact through the nineteenth century. The Newberry honors and respects Chicago’s diverse American Indian community.