Center for Renaissance Studies Programs | Newberry

Center for Renaissance Studies Programs

Pentecost

Pentecost. Case MS 185, f. 10

The Center for Renaissance Studies works with an international consortium of universities in North America and Europe. It offers a wide range of scholarly programs and digital and print publications based in the Newberry collections, and provides a locus for a community of scholars who come from all over the world to use the library’s early manuscripts, printed books, and other materials.


Faculty and graduate students from consortium institutions may be eligible to apply for Newberry Renaissance Consortium Grants to travel to the Newberry to attend programs or do research. Through our reciprocal arrangement with the Folger Institute in Washington, D.C., which also works with a consortium of universities, Institute seminar fees are waived for faculty and graduate students at Newberry Center for Renaissance Studies schools upon acceptance of application.


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2020-2021 Programming Brochure

Upcoming Programs

Friday, October 9, 2020Friday, May 7, 2021
This seminar provides an interdisciplinary, supportive community for graduate students in the early stages of dissertation preparation. Gender plays a critical role in understanding, displaying, and experiencing modes of power across a wide range of cultural activities, ca. 1100-1700.
Friday, November 13, 2020Tuesday, April 13, 2021
The Center for Renaissance Studies (CRS) is pleased to announce a new series of virtual conversations on premodern critical race studies and Indigenous studies. Each hour-long session will feature a conversation between scholars across professional generations about foundational works and the current state of the field. See below for a full list of session topics and speakers.
Friday, December 4, 2020
This workshop will focus on the Mississippi Bubble, a global financial disaster in 1720.
Thursday, December 17, 2020
Dante Lecture
Dante Lecture
This virtual talk will examine the shift in late medieval devotion and spirituality to the affective consideration of and participation to the sufferings of Christ on the Cross (Christus patiens).
Monday, January 4, 2021Monday, March 15, 2021
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Ten-Week Graduate Seminar
This virtual course will introduce you to methods, approaches, uses, and challenges of digital humanities with respect to the study of medieval and early modern cultures. Over the past few decades, scholars in all fields of medieval and early modern studies have increasingly used digital resources to study and teach the premodern past.
Friday, March 19, 2021Friday, March 26, 2021
Renaissance Graduate Programs
This virtual workshop explores typical problems and situations that engage the interest of medieval book historians. Through readings, discussion, and analysis of primary sources, participants will gain experience in a flexible, inventive methodology, and an understanding of how the study of surviving medieval books contributes to the study of medieval literary culture in general.
Friday, April 23, 2021
This workshop will guide participants through the process of developing theatrical productions out of their research interests. Part of a multi-year international project devoted to exploring the educational and commercial viability of the theatrical repertoire from the long eighteenth century, this workshop will focus in particular on Restoration and eighteenth-century performance research.
Saturday, April 24, 2021
Eighteenth-Century Seminar
Anti-race, 1550–1760, Roxann Wheeler