Programs and Events | Newberry

Programs and Events

The Newberry offers programming in the humanities for scholars, teachers, and the general public. Unless otherwise noted, events are free, and no reservations are required. Many of our programs are recorded, and you can listen to them on our website.

E.g., 10/18/2017
E.g., 10/18/2017
Thursday, September 14, 2017Wednesday, December 27, 2017
Now open! Plan your visit to the Newberry to see the exhibition.
Wednesday, October 18, 2017
A Newberry Colloquium
Women were highly sought-after as piano and organ accompanists for silent films, signifying the presence of morality and good taste in the nascent cinema industry.
Saturday, October 21, 2017
Free and open to the public; no registration required
“All the world’s a stage, And all the men and women merely players; They have their exits and their entrances, And one man in his time plays many parts …”
Wednesday, October 25, 2017
Free and open to the public; see below for a link to register
Join us for a performance and panel on the history and future of immigration and refugees in Chicago, in advance of Chicago Opera Theater’s upcoming production of The Consul, Gian Carlo Menotti’s 1950 opera about political refugees.
Thursday, October 26, 2017
Focus on the Book Lecture
As part of the “Focus on the Book” program series sponsored by the Newberry and the Loyola University Chicago Libraries, Dr. Helena Pycior, Professor Emerita of the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, will discuss how Marie Skłodowska Curie, renowned scientist and twice Nobel Prize recipient, became known
Thursday, October 26, 2017
A Meet the Author Program
Free and open to the public; see below for a link to register.
This remarkable cultural history celebrates the great Midwestern city of Chicago for its centrality to the modernist movement.
Saturday, October 28, 2017
Free and open to the public; see below for a link to register
Venice during the early modern era expanded its position as a major crossroads between Europe, Asia, and Africa. A commercial powerhouse, the independent republic mediated between Roman, Protestant, and Byzantine Christian as well as Islamic lands.
Wednesday, November 1, 2017
Free and open to the public; see below for a link to register.
Theologians, philosophers, and church-leaders discuss Luther’s “Protestant” reform as a “churchly” event. But it had (and continues to have) enormous consequences in political, cultural,economic, personal, and social life.
Saturday, November 4, 2017
Colonial History Lecture Series
Free and open to the public; see below for a link to register.
Nathaniel Philbrick will speak about his latest book, Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution, which appeared for seven consecutive weeks on the New York Times
Sunday, November 5, 2017Monday, November 6, 2017
A History of the Book Symposium
Free and open to the public; see below for a link to register.
The Newberry Library and Spertus Institute each house a rich collection of medieval and early modern Jewish manuscripts and printed materials, including two jointly owned books. This one-day symposium celebrates and examines these collections in relation to the social and religious lives of Jews from roughly 1300 to 1700. How did the shift to print affect Jewish thought?
Tuesday, November 7, 2017
Brad Gregory and Mark Noll on the Protestant Reformation and Its Continuing Impact
Free and open to the public; see below for a link to register.
In this installment of “Conversations at the Newberry,” Brad S. Gregory and Mark Noll engage in a conversation about the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century and its continued impact on today’s world.
Wednesday, November 8, 2017
Meet the Author
Free and open to the public; see below for a link to register.
Heralded as America’s most quintessentially modern city, Chicago has attracted the gaze of journalists, novelists, essayists, and scholars as much as any city in the nation. And, yet, few historians have attempted big-picture narratives of the city’s transformation over the twentieth century.
Thursday, November 9, 2017
Free and open to the public. No registration required.
Over many years, the rich archival collections of the Newberry Library have inspired and sustained some of the most significant research and writing in Native American and Indigenous Studies, making it a central site of what we may call “indigenous Chicago.” This panel of prize-winning authors, whose research was based at the Newberry and other major archives, will reflect not only on the power
Saturday, November 11, 2017
Dolls, Toys, and Winter
Free and open to the public; no registration required
This month, join in a unique interactive melange of music and story activities, from long ago through today, from the Newberry collection, including selections from Debussy’s La Boîte à Joujoux/The Toybox; Why Be a Goop?; and Down-adown-Derry: A Book of Fairy Poems. We’ll close with a hands-on Musical Instrument Petting Zoo!
Tuesday, November 14, 2017
Free and open to the public; see below for a link to register.
History textbooks, once they get over describing the Jesuits as the shock troops of the Counter Reformation, often mention that Ignatius of Loyola wrote a book called Spiritual Exercises, and that the order ran a lot of schools. Those two aspects of the Jesuit enterprises will be the subject of Professor O’Malley’s lecture.
Wednesday, November 15, 2017
Thornton Wilder's Prize-Winning The Eighth Day
Free and open to the public; see below for a link to register
Celebrate the fiftieth anniversary and new edition of Wilder’s National Book Award-winning novel with a reception, actors, commentators, and cake!