Programs and Events | Newberry

Programs and Events

Since its founding in 1887, the Newberry has provided public programming in the humanities. Unless otherwise noted, events are free, and no reservations are required.
E.g., 02/14/2016
E.g., 02/14/2016
Friday, January 15, 2016Saturday, April 2, 2016
Through a range of documents and images, Civil War to Civil Rights presents stories of African Americans in Chicago between the mid-nineteenth and mid-twentieth centuries as they reconciled the promise of life in a Northern city with the forms of discrimination and prejudice—both subtle and overt—that many of them encountered on a daily basis.
Tuesday, February 16, 2016
A lecture by Coll Thrush, Associate Professor of History, University of British Columbia
Wednesday, February 17, 2016
Charlotte Smith is recognized today as one of the most popular, influential, and productive writers of the late eighteenth century. In the 1790s, Smith turned her attention to the lucrative children’s book market, producing the first fictions aimed exclusively at pubescent girls. These works allowed Smith to develop a new female heroine for her subsequent novels.
Friday, February 19, 2016
The Newberry Library, in partnership with the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in Chicago, is pleased to welcome Maylis de Kerangal, multiple prize winning French author, to present and discuss her book The Heart. The talk will be moderated by Professor Alison James from the University of Chicago.
Wednesday, February 24, 2016
Join University of Southern California professor Geoffrey Cowan for a conversation about his new book, Let the People Rule: Theodore Roosevelt and the Birth of the Presidential Primary, which tells the exhilarating story of the four-month campaign that changed American politics forever and continues to be relevant in 2016.
Wednesday, February 24, 2016
Men of African American descent were an essential segment of the seafaring work force in the pre-Civil War United States. Recovering the stories of these men is a challenging historical task. One of the small number of working-class African American seafarers who can be followed over his entire life course is James Forten Dunbar.
Saturday, February 27, 2016
Please register by 10 am Friday, February 26
Philosophers typically attribute the foundation of modern thought to René Descartes, who in his Discours de la méthode (1637) extensively deploys metaphors of “founding” for his theory of how the edifice of knowledge is regrounded on the clear and distinct certainty of the cogito: “I think, therefore I am.” Cultural historians sometimes locate a remoter starting point for mode
Saturday, February 27, 2016
Free and open to the public; no tickets or registration required
“How hard it is to hide the sparks of nature!” Filled with intrigue and romance, Shakespeare’s Cymbeline introduces an evil queen, an innocent young princess, an upstanding young man, a conniving villain, and the titular king into the fantastical world of this twist-filled tale. Jeff Christian directs.
Saturday, March 5, 2016
The Genealogy and Local History staff will introduce visitors to the Newberry and explain how to use its collections at an informal orientation. Aimed at researchers new to the library and/or new to genealogical research, this session will last approximately an hour, followed by a short tour of the library.
Thursday, March 10, 2016
Join the Ulster Historical Foundation experts as they describe the ins-and-outs of research in the Emerald Isle. No previous research experience is required. The following topics, covering the whole of Ireland, will be presented: 12-1 pm - Introduction to Irish and Scots-Irish Research
Thursday, March 10, 2016
Drawing upon the Newberry Library’s rich Pullman Company archives, Miriam Thaggert will discuss the material and psychic costs of gender and racial discrimination on the rails and the difficulties—and liberties—of working as a “hand maiden” for the Pullman Palace Car Company.