Programs and Events | Newberry

Programs and Events

The Newberry offers programming in the humanities for scholars, teachers, and the general public. Unless otherwise noted, events are free, and no reservations are required. Many of our programs are recorded, and you can listen to them on our website.

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E.g., 07/12/2020
E.g., 07/12/2020
Monday, July 6, 2020Friday, July 31, 2020
At the Newberry Library
This course will examine French manuscripts and archival materials from the thirteenth to the seventeenth century. The institute will provide a summary outline of the history of handwriting in France, followed by intensive training in reading from facsimiles, both in class and at home.
Thursday, July 16, 2020Thursday, August 27, 2020
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
The Center for Renaissance Studies (CRS) will host a series of virtual professional development seminars. Each seminar meeting will be hosted by a CRS staff member along with experts in the related field. The sessions will provide insights, skills, and tools for scholars on teaching online, publishing, grant writing, and seeking employment outside of academia.
Friday, September 25, 2020
This workshop will introduce participants to strategies and approaches for sharing their work with broad audiences. In particular, our conversations will focus on how to productively engage a diverse range of communities as an expert in premodern culture without leaving academia behind.
Thursday, October 1, 2020Friday, October 30, 2020
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Co-sponsored by the Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library and the Folger Institute’s collaborative research project, Before ‘Farm to Table’: Early Modern Foodways and Cultures, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation
Friday, October 9, 2020Friday, May 7, 2021
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
This seminar provides an interdisciplinary, supportive community for graduate students in the early stages of dissertation preparation. Gender plays a critical role in understanding, displaying, and experiencing modes of power across a wide range of cultural activities, ca. 1100-1700.