Graduate Programs

Book of Hours
Book of Hours, Bruges, c. 1455. Case MS 35.

The Center for Renaissance Studies hosts four major kinds of programs especially for students in master’s or Ph.D. programs in any discipline of medieval, Renaissance, or early modern studies: ten-week graduate seminars held at the Newberry, for which students can earn academic credit at their home institutions; one-day research methods workshops; our annual multidisciplinary graduate student conference; and dissertation seminars. Advanced graduate students are also eligible to apply for our Mellon Summer Institutes in Vernacular Paleography.

Graduate Seminars

See Graduate Seminars for details about how to enroll and information about upcoming seminars.

Graduate Student Conference

The annual graduate student multidisciplinary conference, organized and run by advanced doctoral students, has become a premier opportunity for graduate students to present papers, participate in discussions, and develop collaborations across the field of medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies.

Participants from a wide variety of disciplines find a supportive and collegial forum for their work, meet future colleagues from other institutions and disciplines, and become familiar with the Newberry and its resources. Please see Publications for a list of peer-edited online conference proceedings from the graduate student conference.

One-day Research Methods Workshops

These workshops, led by top consortium scholars, teach students near the beginning of their graduate school careers valuable methodological approaches and expose them to working at a research library, through the lens of a particular topic.

Dissertation Seminars

The Center hosts a series of dissertation seminars in various fields, led by top medieval, Renaissance, and early modern scholars. The seminars are open by competitive application to ABD students at consortium schools who are toward the beginning of their dissertation research. Meeting on Friday afternoons approximately once a month, the seminar focuses on methods and comparisons, and provides comments and criticisms from a larger group of specialists than are available on any single campus.

Note: Graduate students of Center for Renaissance Studies member universities may be eligible to apply for Newberry Renaissance Consortium Grants to attend CRS programs or to do research at the Newberry. Each member university sets its own policies and deadlines; contact your Representative Council member in advance for details.

Past Graduate Programs

Upcoming Events (See also Graduate Seminars, above)

Thursday, September 25, 2014 to Thursday, December 4, 2014
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Daisy Delogu, How to Read "contraires choses": Encounters with the Roman de la Rose

The mid-thirteenth-century Roman de la Rose was arguably the single most influential vernacular text of the (French) Middle Ages.

Friday, September 26, 2014 to Friday, December 5, 2014
Renaissance Graduate Programs
2014 Dissertation Seminar for Historians

This seminar will be devoted to creating a broad-based community of graduate students who are at the beginning stages of working on their dissertations in the late medieval, Renaissance, or early modern history of continental Europe, c. 1300-1700. The goal will be to provide comments and criticisms from a larger group of specialists than would be available on any single campus.

Friday, September 26, 2014 to Friday, December 5, 2014
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Edward Wheatley, Disability and Marginality in Medieval England and France

This course will focus on disabled bodies and the cultural forces that acted upon them, as represented in a variety of types of early Christian and medieval texts in Latin, French, and English. We will devote special attention to blindness because of its strong metaphorical associations in medieval Christian discourse.

Friday, January 9, 2015 to Friday, March 13, 2015
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Jonathan Lyon, Lives and Deeds: Writing Biography in the Middle Ages
Application deadline: November 3

This seminar will focus on a pair of common genres of literature in the Middle Ages, “lives” (vitae) and “deeds” (gestae), in order to introduce students to medieval biographical writing.

Thursday, January 22, 2015 to Saturday, January 24, 2015
Renaissance Graduate Programs
2015 Multidisciplinary Graduate Student Conference
Registration will be open by mid-November

The Center for Renaissance Studies’ annual graduate student conference, organized and run by advanced doctoral students, has become a premier opportunity for emerging scholars to present papers, participate in discussions, and develop collaborations across the field of medieval, Renaissance, and early modern studies.

Friday, March 6, 2015
Renaissance Graduate Programs
March 2015 Research Methods Workshop for Early Career Graduate Students : Introduction to Medieval Studies at the Newberry
Application deadline: January 31, 2015

Students pursuing the study of European culture during the Middle Ages often assume that their serious research will have to take place in European archives.