Calendar

E.g., 10/31/2014
E.g., 10/31/2014
Thursday, September 25, 2014 to Thursday, December 4, 2014
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Daisy Delogu, How to Read "contraires choses": Encounters with the Roman de la Rose

2 to 5 pm, ten Thursdays (class will not meet on Thanksgiving)

The mid-thirteenth-century Roman de la Rose was arguably the single most influential vernacular text of the (French) Middle Ages.

Friday, September 26, 2014 to Friday, December 5, 2014
Renaissance Graduate Programs
2014 Dissertation Seminar for Historians

2 - 5 pm on four Fridays, September 26, October 17, November 7, and December 5.

This seminar will be devoted to creating a broad-based community of graduate students who are at the beginning stages of working on their dissertations in the late medieval, Renaissance, or early modern history of continental Europe, c. 1300-1700. The goal will be to provide comments and criticisms from a larger group of specialists than would be available on any single campus.

Friday, September 26, 2014 to Friday, December 5, 2014
Renaissance Graduate Programs
Edward Wheatley, Disability and Marginality in Medieval England and France

2 to 5 pm Fridays

This course will focus on disabled bodies and the cultural forces that acted upon them, as represented in a variety of types of early Christian and medieval texts in Latin, French, and English. We will devote special attention to blindness because of its strong metaphorical associations in medieval Christian discourse.

Saturday, November 15, 2014
Milton Seminar
Daniel Shore: Milton, Search, and the History of Style

12 noon

Please register by 10 am Friday, November 14

Though scholarship on style has been quick to take advantage of the increased sophistication, power, and scope of current quantitative methods, it has neglected the potential of another seemingly more rudimentary digital tool. Search, Professor Shore argues, can transform the way we investigate and understand the history of style.