Calendar

E.g., 09/18/2014
E.g., 09/18/2014
Thursday, September 18, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
No Exit for Art: European Drama, 1906-1968

6 - 7:30 pm

This class is full and registration has closed.

This lecture and discussion-based seminar will examine the rich period of European theater from the first half of the twentieth century.

Saturday, September 20, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Dostoevsky's The Gambler and The Idiot

10 am - Noon (Morning session) OR 1 - 3 pm (Afternoon session)

Afternoon class is cancelled.

We will examine Dostoevsky’s sprawling and mysterious The Idiot against his compact and fast-moving novel The Gambler and several film adaptations, including Akira Kurosawa’s The Idiot. Through interactions between characters and exploration of various systems of ethics, we will navigate the multiple levels of plot and ideas in The Idiot. Readings will be...

Saturday, September 20, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Shakespeare's Wars of the Roses Power, Action and Conflict

1 - 3 pm

Shakespeare populates his Wars of the Roses plays with vividly drawn characters who use their power to take actions against opposing forces. We will focus our attention on these complex indivudals by studying, viewing, and discussing nine important characters from Shakespeare’s first tetralogy (Henry VI, Parts 1, 2, 3 and Richard III).

Saturday, September 20, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Victoria and Edward VII: The British Monarchy, 1837–1910

10 am - Noon

The Victorian and Edwardian periods encompassed enormous social, political, and cultural changes.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Tales of the Jazz Age

6 - 7:30 pm

Although it was a short period in American culture, the Jazz Age (1919–1929) continues to attract and excite students of American literature and history. We will read literature from Lost Generation and Harlem Renaissance writers to better understand the thrall and significance of the era. In addition to critical articles and essays, we will read This Side of Paradise by F.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
How War Changed Women: Perspectives on British Life, Fiction, and Fashion during World War I

5:45 - 7:45 pm

This class is full and registration has closed.

This seminar considers the lives of British women from the years leading up to the Great War through its aftermath (1910–1925). As women coped with wartime, they forged and expressed new identities through memoirs, novels, imagery, and dress.

Saturday, September 27, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Louis XIV, His Court, and Seventeenth–Century France

1 - 3 pm

This class has been cancelled.

This course offers a well-rounded introduction to Louis XIV’s energetic and complex personality, his complicated love-life, his sophisticated political skills, and his accomplishments in the expansion and modernization of France. Nancy Mitford’s deeply researched The Sun King and W. H.

Tuesday, September 30, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Marcel Proust's The Guermantes Way

6 - 7:30 pm

The third volume of In Search of Lost Time, Proust’s monumental novel, is a dazzling portrait of the salon society of late nineteenth-century Paris rendered in loving detail even as it is ruthlessly satirized. The narrator discovers the shallowness of a world he had mythologized as a boy in Combray.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Mightier than the Sword: The Legacy of Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin

5:45 – 7:45 pm

This class has been cancelled.

Harriet Beecher Stowe’s novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin became a cultural phenomenon soon after it first appeared in the National Era abolitionist newspaper in June 1851, and it has remained an important, although complicated, literary landmark.

Thursday, October 2, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Twenty-first Century Literature

6 - 7:30 pm

What’s new and great in contemporary literature? This seminar will examine recent, award-winning works, including two short novels–Julian Barnes’ Sense of an Ending and Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist–and short stories from Jhumpa Lahiri’s Unaccustomed Earth, George Saunders’ Tenth of December and Elizabeth Strout’s Olive Kitteridge.

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