Calendar

E.g., 01/25/2015
E.g., 01/25/2015
Tuesday, February 17, 2015
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Does God Exist? How Can We Know?

5:45 - 7:45 pm 

Does God exist? Our response to this question guides and informs what we make of ourselves, as well as what we make of the world in which we live. This seminar will use David Bentley Hart’s The Experience of God as an entry point into the question of God’s existence both within the great theistic faiths (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism) and within the current thinking…

Tuesday, February 17, 2015
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Laughter in Paradise: The Divine Joy in the Bible and Beyond

5:45 – 7:45 pm

Christianity is a religion hardly associated with humor. Is there laughter in the Bible? Exploring the theme of laughter as it appears in the traditions, rituals, and religious texts of cultures surrounding the biblical world will inform the discovery of laughter in the Christian Bible itself. A glance at the historical developments within the Christian church will reveal the

Wednesday, February 18, 2015
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Flannery O'Connor and the Agency of Grace

2 - 3:30 pm 

In the work of Flannery O’Connor, the human condition is reduced, often by violent circumstances, to a state in which faith may or may not lead to any kind of salvation or redemption. Freakish tragedies strip O’Connor’s characters of pretention, leaving them in a state of grace—a condition most of them, no doubt, would have preferred to avoid. Following an introduction to southern …

Thursday, February 19, 2015
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Hannah Arendt's The Human Condition

2 - 4 pm 

This course examines the human condition through a close reading of Hannah Arendt’s 1958 work of the same title, which portrays the rise of modern society from its origins in the classical Greek city-state. Short weekly readings will let us appreciate the great complexity and scope of Arendt’s examination—made in prose of surpassing power and beauty—of the forces that have…...

Thursday, February 19, 2015
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus: Existential Literature as Philosophy

5:45 – 7:45 pm

The literary texts of the great French existentialists are perhaps the most effective presentations of their philosophies. Close readings of Jean-Paul Sartre’s Nausea and Albert Camus’ The Stranger will elucidate the themes of existential angst, the absurd, and the possibilities of authentic living and action. Before the first session, please read the Sartre chapter (chapter 10) of...