The Red Power Movement: From Alcatraz to Standing Rock and Beyond | Newberry

The Red Power Movement: From Alcatraz to Standing Rock and Beyond

Dylan Miner: “No Pipelines on Indigenous Land,” in Mary Tremonte, Great Soft Power. Toronto: Mary Tremonte, 2016, Edward E. Ayer Collection

Dr. Nick Estes (Lower Brule Sioux Tribe), University of New Mexico
Wednesday, November 20, 2019

Reception: 5:30 pm / Lecture: 6 pm

Rettinger Hall and Baskes Boardroom

Free and open to the public; registration recommended.
Open to the Public
Center for American Indian Studies Programs
D'Arcy McNickle Distinguished Lecture Series

The 1969 occupation of Alcatraz was a watershed moment for the Red Power movement. It ushered in an era of American Indian protest, and the historic Indigenous-led protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline signaled a rebirth of the Indigenous movement in the twenty-first century. This talk puts the protests at Standing Rock into a longer historical context of the Red Power movement, mapping out its aims, trajectory, and future within North American and global decolonization struggles against resource extraction.

This lecture is held in commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the occupation of Alcatraz Island, which was led by Native activists who were part of the American Indian Movement.

Nick Estes is a citizen of the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe. He is an Assistant Professor in the American Studies Department at the University of New Mexico. Estes is the author of the book Our History Is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance (Verso, 2019). He edited with Jaskiran Dhillon; Standing with Standing Rock: Voices from the #NoDAPL Movement (University of Minnesota, 2019).

Dr. Estes’s book, Our History Is the Future: Standing Rock Versus the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the Long Tradition of Indigenous Resistance will be available for purchase in the Newberry’s Rosenberg Bookshop prior to and after the event.

Cost and Registration Information 

Free and open to the public; free tickets required. Obtain tickets using this online form.

Doors open half an hour before the program begins, with first-come, first-served seating for registered attendees. We will admit walk-ins without tickets if space permits, 10 minutes before the event begins. People with accessibility concerns can request to be seated first. To reserve an access-friendly space in the room, first register using the link above, then email jimenezs@newberry.org at least 48 hours before the event. Seats arranged in this way will be held until 10 minutes before the event starts.