Past Newberry Teachers’ Consortium Seminars

Past Seminars

Thursday, October 23, 2014
The Decline and Fall of the Ottoman Empire : Culture and Politics in the Ottoman Balkans
Wait list only

The Ottoman Empire was one of the longest-lasting empires in world history, stretching across the Middle East, Northern Africa, and Eastern Europe since the 1500s.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014
Art as a Weapon : The Black Chicago Renaissance of the 1930s and 1940s (second session)

This seminar will examine the questions of how and why an African American “Renaissance” in the arts emerged in 1930s Chicago and what impact it had on the ideas about race, class, and politics, both in Chicago and across the nation.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014
Native American Journey Stories
Wait list only

The journey story represents a well-traveled literary path. In countless Euro-America novels and films, an individual moves away from home in search of something better, bigger, or just different, experiencing a reinvention of self.

Friday, October 17, 2014
Putting the Founding Fathers in their Place : Popular Politics in the Early American Republic
Wait list only

In present-day historical memory, the words and deeds of the “Founding Fathers” cast a shadow so large that it often obscures our understanding of the development of American political ideas and institutions.

Thursday, October 16, 2014
Middle East Politics after the Arab Spring

In 2011, the sudden eruption of popular demonstrations across the Arab world filled participants and observers alike with hope in a new dawn of democracy. Three and a half years later, outcomes are decidedly mixed.

Friday, October 10, 2014
Art as a Weapon : The Black Chicago Renaissance of the 1930s and 1940s (first session)
Wait list only

This seminar will examine the questions of how and why an African American “Renaissance” in the arts emerged in 1930s Chicago and what impact it had on the ideas about race, class, and politics, both in Chicago and across the nation.

Thursday, October 9, 2014
Fashioning Modesty : Clothing and Morality in American Culture

Clothing is a moral issue.

Wednesday, October 8, 2014
The Economics of Emerging Markets
Wait list only

One of the most important developments in the past twenty years is the rise of economies outside of North America and Europe (the so-called “first world”). The center of world economic growth has shifted to formerly poor and marginal economies.

Wednesday, April 16, 2014
The Thousand and One Nights between East and West

While The Thousand and One Nights is best known by a few of its often-adapted stories, it as an extremely varied and rich corpus of themes, structures, and genres that have provided a source for authors as varied as Voltaire, Jorge Luis Borges, and Edgar Allen Poe. It is also, for better and for worse, the source of many popular images of the Middle East.

Wednesday, March 12, 2014
The EU Financial Crisis
Full, wait list only

In this course we will examine what causes contributed to the establishment of the European Union and to its crowning achievement, the creation of the Euro.

Thursday, March 6, 2014
The American Renaissance in Context

The canonical period identified by the label “American Renaissance” has enjoyed a durable place in American literary history. However, its origins and its particular shape are peculiar to say the least. F. O. Matthieson’s book by that title concentrated on a half decade from 1850 to 1855 and on specific texts from five authors whose collective output consists of at least ten times as...

Wednesday, March 5, 2014
Sectarianism and its Others: the Politics of Religious Diversity after the Arab Spring
Full, wait list only

A compelling story about religious violence in Syria is making the rounds. In this account the war is an armed conflict pitting Sunnis, who make up the majority of Syria’s population, against the Alawites, who back the Assad regime, and their Shiite allies—Iran and Hezbollah.

Tuesday, March 4, 2014
Love/Poetry
Full, wait list only

This seminar will explore the relationships between love and lyric poetry from Sappho to the early 21st century. We will look at how poets document the discourse of love in their times and help to reshape it, enacting their ideas about the nature of love-sacred or secular, chaste or erotic, conservative or revolutionary-in their most intimate decisions about genre, form, rhetoric, and wording...

Wednesday, February 26, 2014
The Great Gatsby on Screen and in Context (second session)
Full, wait list only

This seminar cultivates strategies for teaching F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby in relation to its film adaptations, privileging the 1974 and 2013 versions. First, we will discuss prompts students can answer during their reading or before a screening, facilitating richer responses to the movies’ images, sounds, and scene structures.

Tuesday, February 25, 2014
Progressive Era Chicago (second session)
Full, wait list only

“Progressive Era Chicago” will explore one of our city’s proudest and most problematic moments. Among issues we will analyze are meatpacking and “The Jungle,” women’s role in politics, Jane Addams, and the tangled history of race and immigration.

Monday, February 24, 2014
American Identity and the 1893 Columbian Exposition: Race, Class, and Gender in Chicago's White and Black Cities
Full, wait list only

In their attempt to assert what we would now call a “world-class” image for Chicago to the rest of the United States, and the world, organizers of the World’s Columbian Exposition had to grapple with issues of identity.

Wednesday, February 19, 2014
The Great Gatsby on Screen and in Context
Full, wait list only

This seminar cultivates strategies for teaching F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby in relation to its film adaptations, privileging the 1974 and 2013 versions. First, we will discuss prompts students can answer during their reading or before a screening, facilitating richer responses to the movies’ images, sounds, and scene structures.

Tuesday, February 18, 2014
Progressive Era Chicago
Full, wait list only

“Progressive Era Chicago” will explore one of our city’s proudest and most problematic moments. Among issues we will analyze are meatpacking and “The Jungle,” women’s role in politics, Jane Addams, and the tangled history of race and immigration.

Friday, February 14, 2014
Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried (second session)
Full, wait list only

This seminar will explore O’Brien’s book, now a standard in high school and college curricula, in the context of the Vietnam war’s tactical and social history, and against the backdrop of O’Brien’s other works, notably If I Die in a Combat Zone, and Going After Cacciato.

Wednesday, February 12, 2014
Race, Identity, and Culture in Olaudah Equiano's Autobiography and Eighteenth-Century Debates about Slavery

At the time Equiano was living and writing, notions of race and nationality were in flux but increasingly powerful justifications for social and economic practices. Both opponents of and apologists for the transatlantic slave trade used emerging ideas about race and culture, especially as applied to African cultures, to support their very different positions—often in surprising ways.

Tuesday, February 11, 2014
Sports as History
Full, wait list only

In recent decades, many scholars have written about the role of sports in history. The role of sport in foreign policy, race, religion, gender, and class have been explored in some detail now. How do sports help define masculinity and femininity? How and why have our perceptions of race changed with first the segregation and then the integration of sports?

Monday, February 10, 2014
The French Revolution and Napoleon: Social and Cultural Causes and Consequences
Full, wait list only

In this seminar we will discuss social and cultural influences on the French Revolution and explore how the revolutionaries and Napoleon changed the society and culture around them. We will examine notions of time, space, life and death during the Revolution as well as ever-changing revolutionary festivals.

Friday, February 7, 2014
Understanding Urban Geography in the Context of Chicago's Transition from Industrial Metropolis to Global City
Full, wait list only

Urban geographers study the structure, form, function, and regulation of urban spaces, landscapes, and places at all scales, spanning the local and the global. Interested in both the built environment and social groups in the city, geographers study the processes that shape their creation and transformation.

Thursday, February 6, 2014
Sensing the Second City: Seeing, Hearing, Smelling, Tasting, and Touching in Chicago History
Full, wait list only

How did Chicagoans interpret the rise of the city in the half-century after the Civil War through their five senses? What might the evidence of the sensory past teach us about their perspectives on the major issues of the day including public health, industrial pollution, the conflict between labor and capital, and political radicalism?

Wednesday, February 5, 2014
Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried
Full, wait list only

This seminar will explore O’Brien’s book, now a standard in high school and college curricula, in the context of the Vietnam war’s tactical and social history, and against the backdrop of O’Brien’s other works, notably If I Die in a Combat Zone, and Going After Cacciato.

Monday, February 3, 2014
La guerre d'Algérie et son héritage culturel au cinéma

A partir de trois films, ce séminaire examinera de plus près l’impact de la guerre d’Algérie sur la société française contemporaine, privilégiant un certain nombre de problèmes: le refoulement individuel et collectif, la ségrégation, la culture des banlieues et la question primordiale de l’identité nationale.

Thursday, January 30, 2014
China Faces the Future: an Introduction to Chinese Politics
Full, wait list only

This seminar provides an introduction to contemporary Chinese politics by exploring three key challenges facing the current regime: environmental degradation, income inequality, and economic reform.

Wednesday, January 29, 2014
Reading and Writing with Comics: You too can bring comics into the classroom!
Full, wait list only

So… you say you’ve heard about how comics can help people read, write, and even inspire social action? Maybe you’ve noticed that comics are increasingly appearing on syllabi and reading curriculum? Are you “on board” with the potential benefits of using comics in the classroom, but don’t know where to start?

Wednesday, December 11, 2013
Empire in Early America
Full, wait list only

When Europeans colonized the Americas, they did so as agents and subjects of empire. More than an abstract theory of government, imperialism touched the lives of early America’s inhabitants in tangible ways, affecting not only where Europeans settled, but also their day-to-day safety and prosperity.

Thursday, December 5, 2013
Spies, Codes, and Surveillance: Intelligence in Twentieth Century History and Beyond
Full, wait list only

This seminar is a study of intelligence gathering and analysis in the twentieth century (and beyond). We will address the role intelligence played in the politics, diplomacy, and strategy of the leading world powers. Special consideration will be given to the eras of the two world wars, and the Cold War, with some implications for our own era.

Thursday, November 14, 2013
Nationalism: Histories and Theories
Full, wait list only

Recently, theories of globalization have questioned the existence of the nation-state and the evolution of trans-national identities. Amidst claims that the nation-state is “whithering,” the paradox of globalization is the continuing relevance of nationalism to the study of collective identities past and present.

Friday, November 8, 2013
The Sense of a Beginning: The First Act in Shakespeare's Plays
Full, wait list only

In this seminar we will consider the opening acts of some of Shakespeare’s plays. It may sound obvious that the opening of a play is important. After all, it has to introduce the audience to the characters, plot, setting (or context), and genre.

Wednesday, November 6, 2013
Latin American Society Through Film (Spanish Language Seminar)
Full, wait list only

The seminar focuses on the representation of Latin American society through contemporary films. We will examine how class, gender and history are depicted by film directors from México, Argentina, Perú and Chile.

Friday, November 1, 2013
Ending Slavery: Some TransAtlantic Comparisons
Full, wait list only

This seminar explores the historical processes by which slavery was proclaimed abolished by various national, imperial, and colonial decrees between the age of democratic revolutions (1770s-1820) through World War I.

Thursday, October 31, 2013
African Conflicts and American Stakes
Full, wait list only

This seminar reviews recent changes in the nature of conflicts in Africa and considers how conflicts have ended and the mainsprings of ongoing ones.

Wednesday, October 30, 2013
Home Front: Daily Life in the Civil War North

The Civil War occupies a prominent place in our national collective memory. The war is often portrayed a battle over the future of slavery, often focusing on Lincoln’s determination to save the Union, or highlighting the brutality of brother fighting against brother.

Monday, October 28, 2013
Television and American Identity (second session)
Full, wait list only

This seminar will offer a number of approaches to understanding the impact of American television programs, platforms, and social media communities on the formation of identity, especially for adolescents today.

Thursday, October 24, 2013
Villains and Victims
Full, wait list only

We’ll explore the thin line between comedy and tragedy, as we read Much Ado about Nothing and Othello.

Friday, October 18, 2013
Teaching "Beowulf" in the 21st Century

What’s new in teaching Beowulf?

Thursday, October 17, 2013
National Security and the Constitution
Full, wait list only

This seminar will explore how the United States Constitution allocates governmental responsibility for protecting national security, that is, for the conduct of foreign affairs and the use of military force.

Wednesday, October 16, 2013
The Poetics of Nationalism

The ethnoracial nationalist movements that arose in the U.S. in the late 1960s disrupted conventional understanding of the role of poetry in relation to politics and society.

Thursday, October 10, 2013
Revolutionary Russia
Full, wait list only

The Russian Revolution set in motion much of twentieth-century history.

Wednesday, October 9, 2013
"A Nation of Nations" America's Immigration History
Full, wait list only

This seminar explores the complex history of immigration in the United States.

Tuesday, October 8, 2013
Hot Topics in Climate Change Science

This seminar will explore the following topics in climate change science

Monday, October 7, 2013
Television and American Identity
Full, wait list only

This seminar will offer a number of approaches to understanding the impact of American television programs, platforms, and social media communities on the formation of identity, especially for adolescents today.

Friday, October 4, 2013
Interpreting the Ottoman Past: Culture and Politics in the Ottoman Balkans
Full, wait list only

The Ottoman Empire was one of the largest and longest-lasting empires in world history, stretching across the Middle East, Northern Africa, and Eastern Europe since the 1500s.

Thursday, October 3, 2013
The Family in Flux: Changing Conceptions of the Family in Theory and Practice

The family—its purpose, conventions, and importance—is a subject of persistent inquiry in the humanities

Tuesday, May 21, 2013
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Art and the American Civil War

This seminar will explore the history of Civil War-related art, as well as the great rewards and challenges of using visual evidence in historical research and the classroom.

Tuesday, April 16, 2013
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Two Frontiers in Turn-of-the-Century America
Wait list only

This seminar will consider ways of using literature and visual art from the period to discuss two very different kinds of frontiers in the United States of the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries: the rapidly disappearing West and the even more rapidly rising city.

Thursday, April 11, 2013
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Chicago Area Waterway System

The Chicago Area Waterway System (CAWS) has been instrumental in transforming Chicago from a mudhole into a thriving commercial and cultural metropolis. The CAWS is a 130-mile network of natural and constructed rivers, canals, locks and other structures in Chicago and northwest Indiana.

Wednesday, April 10, 2013
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Sensing the Second City : Seeing, Hearing, Smelling, Tasting, and Touching in Chicago History

How did Chicagoans interpret the rise of the city in the half-century after the Civil War through their five senses? What might the evidence of the sensory past teach us about their perspectives on the major issues of the day including public health, industrial pollution, the conflict between labor and capital, and political radicalism?

Tuesday, April 9, 2013
NTC: The Reformation

This seminar will explore several recent developments in the historical understanding of the Reformation era in the 16th century, and seek to answer the following questions:What were the cultural and theological differences between Catholics and Protestants, and among different kinds of Protestants?

Thursday, April 4, 2013
NTC: N. Scott Momaday’s The Way to Rainy Mountain: A Journey in Storytelling

In 1968, Kiowa writer N. Scott Momaday won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel “House Made of Dawn.” That moment is often understood as the start of the Native American Renaissance, a period characterized by unprecedented publication of literature by American Indian writers.

Wednesday, April 3, 2013
NTC: The Emancipation Proclamation at 150
Wait list only

This seminar offers an opportunity to reconsider the significance of the Emancipation Proclamation. Was it a turning point in American history, or has its importance been exaggerated? How and why did slavery end in the United States? We’ll do our best to address these questions, drawing on primary sources and on recent writing by historians.

Friday, March 8, 2013
NTC: Sex, Violence and Gladiators: Teaching the Roman Empire (without Hollywood) (Session 2)

This seminar explores teaching methods and tools (e.g. images, sources, documentaries) for approaching Imperial Rome. We will approach the Roman Empire not just as a historical subject, but also as a teaching tool to analyze how modern concepts of the past are formed (e.g. the changing nature of sources and scholarship).

Wednesday, March 6, 2013
NTC: Sex, Violence and Gladiators: Teaching the Roman Empire (without Hollywood)
Wait list only

This seminar explores teaching methods and tools (e.g. images, sources, documentaries) for approaching Imperial Rome. We will approach the Roman Empire not just as a historical subject, but also as a teaching tool to analyze how modern concepts of the past are formed (e.g. the changing nature of sources and scholarship).

Wednesday, February 27, 2013
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Shakespeare’s Language in Context: Its History, Originality, and Legacy

This seminar will analyze aspects of Shakespeare’s language that add depth to modern readers’ understanding of the Bard.

Tuesday, February 26, 2013
NTC: The Grid and the Lake: Collisions of the Natural and Built Environments in Chicago Fiction and Poetry

In this seminar, we will examine a crucial aspect of city life: the relationship between the built environment and the natural world. How does the man-made obliterate or exclude the natural? How do writers and artists depict this tension, which is especially prominent in Chicago, due to our relationship to Lake Michigan?

Wednesday, February 20, 2013
NTC: The Scarlet Letter: Gender, History, and American Culture

Nathaniel Hawthorne’s novel, “The Scarlet Letter,” is one of the principal texts through which American students come to know the Puritans. Yet “The Scarlet Letter” was published in 1850, long after the last Puritan had died. What does this narrative of seventeenth-century sin, punishment, love, and redemption tell us about nineteenth-century New England culture?

Tuesday, February 19, 2013
NTC: Writing and New Media (Session 2)

While some scholars and critics disparage the rise of new media for communication like text messaging, Facebook, Twitter, and blogs, others praise these media as exciting and worthwhile technologies for written communication. This seminar will take up this debate.

Thursday, February 14, 2013
NTC: The Environmental Movement

The 1960s and early 1970s witnessed an explosion in the environmental consciousness and activism of Americans, resulting in a spate of new laws, agencies, and organizations.  This seminar will explore the most important recent scholarship about the origins and significance of environmentalism.  Seminar participants will have a discussion-based format, interpreting and conversing about

Wednesday, February 13, 2013
NTC: Teaching Film and Literature (Session 2)

This seminar aims to practice and discuss several means of encouraging students to engage with narrative cinema at the level of detail and intensity that they apply when close-reading works of literature, to include strategies for working across film and literature as a way of developing student insights into the poetics and structures of both forms.

Tuesday, February 12, 2013
NTC: LGBT History is US History: Ideas of integrating LGBT History into your curriculum.

This seminar will explore how teachers can incorporate Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender (LGBT) History into their US History courses. We will consider a range of examples that suggest that LGBT people have a history and that their history has been central to the development of political, social and cultural change.

Monday, February 11, 2013
NTC: Allen Ginsberg and the Postwar Avant-Garde

Rather than read Allen Ginsberg exclusively as a Beat Generation writer, this seminar will study Ginsberg as a poet immersed in the major avant-garde movements of the postwar United States.

Friday, February 8, 2013
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Gandhi and the Indian Nationalist Movement
Wait list only

This seminar will focus on different aspects of the ideology and politics of Indian nationalism in the 19th and 20th centuries, and examine its relationship with identities based on religion, class, gender and caste. This seminar will also examine the role that Gandhi’s unconventional and often controversial politics, played in the Indian nationalist movement.

Wednesday, February 6, 2013
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Dangerous Ideas: Latino/a Literature and the Arizona HB 2281

In May 2010, Arizona governor Jan Brewer signed into law House Bill 2281, which prohibits Arizona public schools from offering courses that promote resentment toward a race or class of people, promote overthrow of the U.S. government, or advocate ethnic solidarity. This seminar will examine four short stories by writers that appear on the list of books banned as a consequence of HB 2281.

Tuesday, February 5, 2013
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Writing and New Media
Wait list only

While some scholars and critics disparage the rise of new media for communication like text messaging, Facebook, Twitter, and blogs, others praise these media as exciting and worthwhile technologies for written communication. This seminar will take up this debate.

Friday, February 1, 2013
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The ‘Arab spring’: Beyond the Secularist-Islamist Divide
Wait list only

The Tunisian revolution has been described as “a secular revolution. Not a secularist revolution, but secular in the sense that it was neither Islamist nor secularist.” This course will evaluate the promise and pitfalls of revolutionary politics and the potential for democratic pluralism in the twenty-first century Middle East and North Africa.

Wednesday, January 30, 2013
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Las Peliculas de Pedro Almodóvar (Taught in Spanish)

Pedro Almodóvar is the cultural symbol par excellence of the restoration of democracy in Spain after nearly 40 years of the dictatorship of Francisco Franco. Since Almodóvar’s emergence as a transgressive underground cineaste in the late 1970s and early 1980s he has gone on to establish himself as the country’s most important filmmaker and a major figure on the stage of world cinema.

Monday, January 28, 2013
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Teaching Film and Literature
Wait list only

This seminar aims to practice and discuss several means of encouraging students to engage with narrative cinema at the level of detail and intensity that they apply when close-reading works of literature, to include strategies for working across film and literature as a way of developing student insights into the poetics and structures of both forms.

Tuesday, December 4, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Origins of the Cold War (Session 2)

After the US entry into the first world war and the Bolshevik revolution-both in 1917-the two emerging superpowers set aside their mutual antagonisms to battler Hitler’s Third Reich in 1941. Their wartime collaboration turned into postwar rivalry which defined international relations for the next half century.

Thursday, November 29, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Origins of the Cold War
Wait list only

From wartime tensions over supply and the “second front” to postwar frictions over the peace and emerging (and conflicting) spheres of interest, domestic political, economic, social-cultural, as well as diplomatic and strategic factors will be examined.

Thursday, November 8, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Flashpoints and Deep Trends: Critical Cases for Politics in Africa
Wait list only

This seminar provides an introduction to politics in contemporary Africa through the lens of four critical case studies, each one tracing a path from colonial realities to current challenges and opportunities. The cases examined will be Kenya, The Sudan, Nigeria, and Zimbabwe.

Monday, November 5, 2012
NTC: History of Your Students' Lifetimes
Wait list only

Students love, and arguably deserve, having their own lifetimes placed in historical context; events such as the financial crisis, Barack Obama, the Tea Party, current vaccination struggles, and public sector labor conflicts. In this seminar, participants will explore some of these contemporary issues, as well as try to figure out how these issues fit into an already over-burdened curriculum...

Friday, November 2, 2012
NTC: Ocular Proof: Shakespeare on Film
Wait list only

Participants will discuss a range of Shakespeare films that take a variety of approaches to transmuting the plays from page/stage to screen. We will break down the false high culture (literature)/popular – or even low – culture (film) dichotomy, exploring the intertextual relationship between the films and the plays that inspired them.

Tuesday, October 30, 2012
NTC: The “Race” of the Harlem Renaissance from Right to Left

The protagonist of James Weldon Johnson’s iconic work of the Harlem Renaissance “The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man” declares at one point, “Between people in like stations of life there is very little difference over the world.”  This statement exemplifies what David Levering Lewis identifies as the fundamental credo the Talented Tenth, “that the assimilated, cultured Afro-Saxon was e

Monday, October 29, 2012
NTC: Teaching with Things: Historical Archaeology and Material Culture in History Education

This seminar will introduce participants to the discipline of historical archaeology, also known as the archaeology of the recent past.  Historical archaeology is interdisciplinary in nature and combines traditional archaeological methods of excavation and survey with documentary analysis, oral history, and architectural studies.  This disciplinary introduction will facilitate a prese

Thursday, October 25, 2012
NTC: Latinos in American Society: Origins, Histories, Destinies
Wait list only

This seminar will explore the diversity of Latino experiences in the United States from 1492 to the present. he themes of our discussion will include: race mixing, notions of ethnicity and nationality, reactive identities, the 1960s and 1970 civil rights movements, and contemporary demography.

Wednesday, October 24, 2012
NTC: Financial Crises, Monetary Policy and the Federal Reserve System
Wait list only

This seminar will focus on the role that the Fed plays in “normal times,” in setting monetary policy to obtain the dual congressionally mandated goals of price stability and maximum sustainable growth, as well as the Fed’s role as lender of last resort in times of financial crisis.

Tuesday, October 23, 2012
NTC: Poets Without Borders

Though we frequently think of poets as icons of their national literary traditions —Walt Whitman, for example, is often read as the 19th-Century’s self-styled  “voice of America”—few vocations have entailed more border-crossing, displacement, and exile than that of the poet.  In this course, we will study three writers who make their art out of a “transnational” movement, rather than

Thursday, October 18, 2012
NTC: Cultural Revolution: Changing Hearts and Minds
Wait list only

In this seminar we will be discussing the place of material culture, ritual, and everyday life during the three revolutionary moments that ushered in the modern political era – the English, American, and French. In each case revolutionaries thought that while reasoned argument could make republican minds, democratic goods, habits, and rituals were needed to make republican hearts...

Monday, October 15, 2012
NTC: The Body in American Popular Culture
Wait list only

This seminar examines representations of the body in American popular culture and exploring the philosophical roots of contemporary notions of embodiment, to reveal the ways bodies matter to our beliefs about morality, power, and the self–even as we disavow its importance. In this seminar, we will also discuss strategies for teaching students to decode images and ideologies of the body...

Friday, October 12, 2012
NTC: Media, Politics and The Constructions of Political Realities

This seminar will explore the structural biases of the mass media and the ways in which political realities are framed and constructed. Specifically, the seminar will revolve around a number of questions such as:  What is the role of the media in American democracy? How do the media distort political reality? What are the sources of media power?

Thursday, October 11, 2012
NTC: Mark Twain, Huckleberry Finn, and the Racial Dilemma
Wait list only

We might wonder how a book designed to critique racial, and racist, assumptions has come to be viewed as part of the problem.

Wednesday, October 10, 2012
NTC: Il était une fois: Les Contes de fées de Charles Perrault.

Dans ce séminaire, il s’agit des contes de fées de Charles Perrault, écrivain du dix-septième siècle. Grand défenseur de la modernité dans la querelle des Anciens et des Modernes, ses contes de fées représentent une littérateur originale et “moderne.” On commence par discuter sa contribution au genre dans le contexte de la querelle.

Tuesday, October 9, 2012
NTC: The Religious Right in Historical Perspective
Wait list only

Convention states religion and politics are the two things you do not discuss in polite company. But heading into this election year, they seem to be all that matters. In this seminar, we will bring some historical context to all of this punditry on religion and the American electorate by exploring the history of the Religious Right.

Friday, May 25, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Teaching Film and Literature (Session 2)
Wait List Only

This seminar aims to practice and discuss several means of encouraging students to engage with narrative cinema at the level of detail and intensity that they apply when close-reading works of literature, to include strategies for working /across/ film and literature as a way of developing student insights into the poetics and structures of both forms.

Thursday, May 24, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
A History of Boredom in the United States (Session 2)
Wait List Only

Today, American boredom appears to be a plague of epidemic proportions—one held responsible for almost every type of undesirable behavior running counter to what are considered acceptable social norms.

Wednesday, May 23, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Chicago and the Civil War
Wait List Only

Chicago sits more than 600 miles from Gettysburg and more than 700 miles from Manassas and Atlanta, yet the city’s residents were intimately connected to the Civil War. Although the city was less than 30 years old when the war began, Chicago provided troops, supplies, and relief to the Union Army that proved critical to the war effort.

Tuesday, May 22, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Devil is in the Details : History, Literature, and the World's Columbian Exposition of 1893
Wait List Only

“History” was everywhere at the World’s Columbian Exposition, the gigantic world’s fair staged in Chicago in 1893.

Wednesday, May 16, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Teaching Film and Literature (Session 1)
Wait List Only

This seminar aims to practice and discuss several means of encouraging students to engage with narrative cinema at the level of detail and intensity that they apply when close-reading works of literature, to include strategies for working /across/ film and literature as a way of developing student insights into the poetics and structures of both forms.

Tuesday, May 15, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: A History of Boredom in the United States (Session 1)
Wait List Only

Today, American boredom appears to be a plague of epidemic proportions—one held responsible for almost every type of undesirable behavior running counter to what are considered acceptable social norms.

Wednesday, April 11, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Reconstruction: The Right to Vote and the Practice of Politics
Wait List Only

The topic of this seminar is the remarkable transformation of southern African Americans from slaves into voting citizens during Reconstruction. Participants will discuss debates over voting rights, how freedmen voted, whom they voted for, and how southerners understood politics in this dynamic and controversial era.

Seminar led by Kate Masur, Northwestern University

Friday, March 9, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Literary Theory: Words and Power
Wait List Only

Socrates found poets to be so dangerous he wished to exile them from his Republic. Who fears poets and literature today? Perhaps we should more than we are aware. Both totalitarian and democratic regimes have, it is argued, ways of regulating words, spreading myths, and mitigating dissent. This seminar will explore the links between literature and the world it describes.

Tuesday, March 6, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Religion, Propaganda, and War: Medieval and Modern Understanding of The Crusades (Session 2)
Wait List Only

This seminar explores the crusades in their historical setting - the causes, motives, and impacts on relations between medieval Christians and Muslims - and as they shape discourse today.

Thursday, March 1, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Religion, Propaganda, and War: Medieval and Modern Understanding of The Crusades (Session 1)
Wait List Only

This seminar explores the crusades in their historical setting - the causes, motives, and impacts on relations between medieval Christians and Muslims - and as they shape discourse today.

Tuesday, February 28, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: That Old-Time Religion in Modern America: Evangelicalism, Fundamentalism, and American Culture
Wait List Only

Religion and politics are two topics we’re told to avoid in discussions with polite company, but they’ve been central in the shaping of American culture. In this seminar, participants will focus on the history of Protestant fundamentalism, accounting not only its origins but also its enduring infliuence in American life.

Thursday, February 23, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Jóvenes en las pantallas plateadas: Representaciones de la juventud en el cine latinoamericano, 1960-2000s

Desde las imágenes de los chicos humildes corriendo a un tren en movimiento y pidiendo a sus pasajeros “diez centavos” en el documental de Fernando Birri Tire Dié (Argentina, 1961) hasta la historia de dos adolescentes de clase media en su aventura hedonista y sexualizada en el film de Alfonso Cuadrón Y tu mamá también (México, 2001), la juventud ocupó frecuentemente el...

Thursday, February 23, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Money in Early America

Few political issues inspired such intense debate among eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Americans as what should serve as money, who should control its creation and circulation, and according to what rules.

Tuesday, February 21, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: The Birth of Diplomacy in Early Modern Europe (1494-1713)
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Between Charles VIII’s invasion of Italy in 1494 and the signing of the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713, European diplomacy underwent fundamental changes that still influence diplomatic theory and practice today.

Thursday, February 16, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Coming of Age on the Screens: Youth, Culture, and Politics in Latin American Film, 1960-2000s

From the working-class children running along a moving train and asking its passengers for a dime in Fernando Birri’s documentary Tire Dié (Throw me a Dime, Argentina, 1961) to the story of the two middle-class boys pursuing a hedonistic and sexualized “road trip” in Alfonso Cuadrón’s Y tu mamá también (And your Mum Too, Mexico, 2001), youth have been at the center of cin

Wednesday, February 15, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Gender, Race, and Faith in Puritan New England
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In this seminar, participants will examine A True History of the Captivity and Restoration of Mrs. Mary Rowlandson as a text through which to explore questions about Puritan faith and culture, the experiences and status of women within that culture, and the history of Puritan conflict with Native American tribes.

Tuesday, February 7, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Beat Generation Poetry and the Politics of Gender
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This seminar will explore questions of gender and power in the poetry of canonical and lesser-known poets of the Beat Generation. Even though Beat writers thrived on the margins of the post-World War II United States, they often reproduced the same gender inequities of a dominant culture that they felt was stifling.

Monday, February 6, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: In His Father's Footsteps?: Richard M. Daley's Shaping of Post-Industrial Chicago
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From Millennium Park to Northerly Island and the 1996 Democratic National Convention to the failed 2016 Olympic bid, Richard M. Daley’s shaping power on the city of Chicago, for good and/or ill, has been second only to that of his father, Richard J. Daley.

Thursday, February 2, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Money in Early America
Wait List Only

Few political issues inspired such intense debate among eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Americans as what should serve as money, who should control its creation and circulation, and according to what rules.

Friday, January 27, 2012
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: The Languages of the Foreign: J.M. Coetzee's "Waiting for the Barbarians"

This seminar will examine the relationship between the many intangible nuances of foreignness and the quite literal and material designation of foreignness, with the demarcations that designate who belongs in a place and who doesn’t, with the segregation of ethnicities, nationalities or “races.” Through a reading of J. M.

Tuesday, December 6, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Origins of the Second World War in Europe (Session 2)
Wait List Only

The origins of the second world war in Europe appear deceptively simple. For some, the flaws of the Versailles Treaty led to a demoralized German nation and an unstable international system.

Thursday, December 1, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Origins of the Second World War in Europe (Session 1)
Wait List Only

The origins of the second world war in Europe appear deceptively simple. For some, the flaws of the Versailles Treaty led to a demoralized German nation and an unstable international system.

Monday, November 14, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: The Origins of the Conservative Movement in the U.S. (Session 2)
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Historians looking for an apt titling of the current era have often pointed to the last several decades as the age of conservatism. Yet historians–themselves overwhelmingly left-of-center–have only recently come to grips with the massive transformation wrought by conservative politics and ideas.

Friday, November 11, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Lessons in Love: Ovid's Influence on English Renaissance Poetry

Few writers were more influential to Renaissance poets than Ovid. Tudor schoolboys studied his poems from /The Metamorphoses/, rhetoricians used his poems as models of exemplary letter writing, and Renaissance dramatists and poets incorporated his stories into their greatest works. But how did Renaissance writers understand the profound violence at the heart of Ovid’s erotic poems?

Thursday, November 10, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: The Origins of the Conservative Movement in the U.S. (Session 1)
Wait List Only

Historians looking for an apt titling of the current era have often pointed to the last several decades as the age of conservatism. Yet historians–themselves overwhelmingly left-of-center–have only recently come to grips with the massive transformation wrought by conservative politics and ideas.

Wednesday, November 9, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Portraying War in Film: Historical Films and Interpretation

Viewers of historical films often focus on questions of authenticity, asking whether a film has portrayed “accurately” what “really” happened during a historical event. Filmmakers certainly claim to present authentic history, spending lavishly to re-create the past by establishing the proper “look” of historical settings.

Monday, November 7, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Indians of the Midwest: Teaching Native American History with Online Resources
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This seminar will provide strategies for using web-based resources when teaching students about Native American history and culture. The seminar will discuss the means of determining reliable and authoritative educational sites for their own teaching and for student research.

Friday, November 4, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: "Paris change!": poésies capitales au 19e siècle

Surtout depuis la Révolution, la littérature française a souvent évolué de pair avec la ville capitale, toutes deux participant au nouvel urbanisme, aux tourmentes politiques, et aux triomphes artistiques qui marquent le 19e siècle en France.

Thursday, November 3, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Media, Culture, Politics, and the War of Ideologies in the Middle East Today (Session 2)

This seminar will provide a critical interrogation of the dominant ideologies of so-called modernity and modernization in the post-colonial Arab world (and the Middle East more generally), with a specific focus on contemporary Islamism in the context of the recent Arab revolts.

Tuesday, November 1, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Media, Culture, Politics, and the War of Ideologies in the Middle East Today (session 1)
Wait List Only

This seminar will provide a critical interrogation of the dominant ideologies of so-called modernity and modernization in the post-colonial Arab world (and the Middle East more generally), with a specific focus on contemporary Islamism in the context of the recent Arab revolts.

Thursday, October 27, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Why are Some Countries Rich and Some Countries Poor?
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There are enormous differences in living standards between rich and poor countries in the world today. Per capita income in the richest 20 countries, comprising about one-quarter of the world’s population, is about five times the global average and over twenty times the level in the world’s poorest countries.

Wednesday, October 26, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: The Transformation of Chicago's Physical Environment
Wait List Only

Cities represent spatial and temporal transformations of the physical environment. Their location and subsequent patterns of growth are dependent in part on the characteristics of the physical environment.

Monday, October 24, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: The Law and Politics of International Organizations
Wait List Only

 International organizations such as the United Nations exist at the intersection between domestic and international affairs, and between legal and political questions.

Wednesday, October 12, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Questioning Peter's Greatness: Measuring the Human Cost of Moderization and Imperial Expansion in Early Modern Eurasia
Wait List Only

This seminar explores the darker side of the legacy of Peter I of Russia (ruled 1694-1725). Rather than imagine his reign as a period of greatness, the seminar will examine the social cost of Peter’s repeated failures as a ruler.

Tuesday, October 11, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: The War in Vietnam and the Poetics of Race
Wait List Only

Poetry of the War in Viet Nam War provides a compelling case study of war literature in general, showcasing many of its major themes while refracting those themes through the formal demands of the lyric. Examining a diverse collection of poets—including Allen Ginsberg, W.D.

Friday, October 7, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Feminism and American Political Liberalism: A Comparison
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What is the state of American feminism today? Is it still countercultural? Was it ever? While commonly understood as a political and social movement against mainstream culture, feminism is also surprisingly consistent with elements of classical American political and social theory.

Wednesday, October 5, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: Why Sharpen the Knife? Why Wield the Pen?: Exploring the Contested Aesthetics of African American Literature through the “Wright-Hurston Debate”
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Zora Neale Hurston famously stated that she is not “tragically colored” and does not belong to the “sobbing school of negrohood.” Richard Wright, in his review of /Their Eyes Were Watching God/, criticizes Hurston for continuing the tradition of minstrelsy and pandering to a white audience and, as critics have characterized his position, for neglecting to address the key issue...

Thursday, May 26, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
America’s Response to the Holocaust

Although there is widespread agreement that American authorities knew of Hitler’s plan to annihilate Europe’s Jews by 1942, there is no consensus about the nature and effectiveness of America’s response to the Holocaust.

Tuesday, May 24, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Geographies of Financial Crises

The current US financial crisis that began in 2008 has been depicted in the media as the first great financial crisis since the advent of the Great Depression in 1929. Yet, financial crises have occurred for centuries.  The solutions taken, and more significantly, the solutions sanctioned by international financial institutions, are very different depending on where the crisis occurs.

Thursday, May 19, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Interpreting the Hidden Self: /The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde/

In this perennially popular, short, and sensational (i.e., teachable!) book, we are confronted with one of literature’s most enduring and chilling tales of a hidden or repressed self. Just what is the relation of Stevenson’s hideous Mr. Hyde to the urbane Dr. Jekyll?

Tuesday, May 17, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Placing 19th century Women's Activism in Global Perspective

Much ink has been spilled on the need to make U.S. history more transnational. In this seminar, participants will read and discuss the historical literature that places the 19th century women’s movement in a global context. Whether in terms of suffrage or temperance, this emerging work will help participants think about how to incorporate gender into lessons that focus on U.S.

Tuesday, May 17, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Teaching Film and Literature (Session 2)

This seminar aims to practice and discuss several means of encouraging students to engage with narrative cinema at the level of detail and intensity that they apply when close-reading works of literature, to include strategies for working /across/ film and literature as a way of developing student insights into the poetics and structures of both forms.  Seminar participants will begin with

Friday, April 8, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Ken Kesey's /One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest/

Ken Kesey’s /One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest/ was a seminal novel for the 1960s counterculture, as well as an important American inheritor of European ideas of Existentialism and the absurd. It is also a novel highly conscious of its place in an American tradition of frontier narrative that connects Cooper’s Leatherstocking saga with the modern Western.

Wednesday, April 6, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Culture and Politics in the Latin American "Long Sixties"

From Ernesto “Che” Guevara’s victory alongside Fidel Castro in Cuba in 1959 to the military coup d’état against President Salvador Allende in Chile in 1973, the Latin American “long sixties” were suffused by a feeling of imminence, of “change about to happen”.

Tuesday, March 15, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Fashion: The Politics of Style in American Culture

Fashion is a powerful symbolic language for saying who we are, what we do, and what we value.  Like all languages, fashion has a history, and therefore requires that we play by rules that we inherit as much as we invent.  As a result, fashion exists at the intersection of tradition and modernity, and can be used to both defend and critique the status quo.

Thursday, March 10, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Gender and Culture during the Cold War

The Cold War was arguably the longest modern conflict between competing nations and ideologies.  Much of the combat was communicated through media and related speculation about life on the other side.  New definitions of masculinity and femininity emerged as gender became a particularly scrutinized means of measuring differences between East and West.  On both sides of the wall,

Tuesday, March 8, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
"City of the Big Shoulders": Chicago Poetry in the Twentieth Century

The centrality of Chicago and the mobility of its inhabitants generated an aesthetic of openness and experiment that was particularly hospitable to the major writers and artists of the era.  This seminar will focus primarily on poetry in Chicago by contextualizing it within larger cultural movements here and further abroad.  Seminar participants will read and discuss writings by Carl

Friday, March 4, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The History of Your Students' Lifetimes

Students love, and arguably deserve, having their own lifetimes placed in historical context.  And while some call such attempts to place the current moment in historical context mere journalism, scholars have already done quite sophisticatedwork on events such as the election of 2000, 9/11, Katrina, the financial crisis, and the Tea Party.  In this seminar, participants will explore

Friday, March 4, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Making of a "Good War": American Thought During WWII (Session 2)

This seminar will examine the varieties of American intellectual responses to WWII in the 1940s and 50s.  Seminar participants will explore how American commentators made sense of the war, justified American involvement, and likewise how the war set new terms for American self-understanding.   By looking at developments in American political thought, moral philosophy, cultural cr

Thursday, March 3, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The History of Your Students' Lifetimes

Students love, and arguably deserve, having their own lifetimes placed in historical context.  And while some call such attempts to place the current moment in historical context mere journalism, scholars have already done quite sophisticatedwork on events such as the election of 2000, 9/11, Katrina, the financial crisis, and the Tea Party.  In this seminar, participants will explore

Wednesday, March 2, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Reformers, Heretics, and Soldiers: The European Wars of Religion

Religious reforms and civil conflicts produced excitement, division, chaos, and horror during the European Wars of Religion. In this seminar, participants will explore the religious conflicts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries and the experiences of the people who lived through them.

Friday, February 25, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Bollywood in the Classroom

Incorporating the gorgeous and glossy films of Bollywood in the classroom can be a challenge.

Thursday, February 17, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Four Modernizations: To Save Socialism or To Dismantle It?

Since the advent of the Four Modernizations under the aegis of Deng Xiaoping in late 1978, Chinese society, culture, economy-indeed, almost every aspect of life-has been transformed. At the same time, however, the country’s Maoist and more distant Republican and Imperial pasts have continued to inform and shape reform.

Wednesday, February 16, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Teaching Film and Literature

This seminar aims to practice and discuss several means of encouraging students to engage with narrative cinema at the level of detail and intensity that they apply when close-reading works of literature, to include strategies for working /across/ film and literature as a way of developing student insights into the poetics and structures of both forms.  Seminar participants will begin with

Friday, February 11, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Abraham Lincoln's America, 1809-1865

In this seminar participants will use the life of the republic’s most celebrated president as a window to explore the transformations and continuities in American politics, cultures, economics, ideologies, and social life during the half- century ending in the cataclysmic Civil War.

Friday, February 11, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Visual Literacy, Visual Rhetoric

In this seminar, participants will explore several approaches to reading and responding to visually complex texts. Color, image, style, movement –these are all features of a sophisticated visual rhetoric.

Thursday, February 10, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Gender and Culture during the Cold War (Session 2)

The Cold War was arguably the longest modern conflict between competing nations and ideologies.  Much of the combat was communicated through media and related speculation about life on the other side.  New definitions of masculinity and femininity emerged as gender became a particularly scrutinized means of measuring differences between East and West.  On both sides of the wall,

Thursday, February 10, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Visual Literacy, Visual Rhetoric (Session 2)

In this seminar, participants will explore several approaches to reading and responding to visually complex texts. Color, image, style, movement –these are all features of a sophisticated visual rhetoric.

Wednesday, February 9, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
African Americans Encounter Africans: Race and American Black Identity, 1865-1965

Historians have documented the important cultural values that a wide variety of African peoples brought here as captives on slave ships.  Yet, scholars have focused less on how blacks in America have imagined and encountered Africans in the postbellum period.  Based on the wonderful new book by James Campbell, /Middle Passages/, and a variety of other secondary as well as primary sour

Wednesday, February 9, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Un roman québécois: /Volkswagen Blues/ de Jacques Poulin

Dans le roman Volkswagen Blues, de Jacques Poulin, un écrivain nommé Jack Waterman entreprend un voyage accompagné par une jeune Amérindienne, Pitsémine – à travers l’Amérique du Nord, d’est en ouest, à la recherche de son frère Théo, qu’il n’a pas vu depuis 15 ans.  Leur parcours est littéraire aussi bien que réel, car les traces laissées par Théo sont en grande partie textuelles.  I

Tuesday, February 8, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Innovation and Entrepreneurship in Japan in the 21st Century: Ancient Meets Modern

In August 2010, China surpassed Japan to take the number two spot(after the United States) as the world’s second largest economy. Will Japan be able to keep up with economic growth in China and India?

Monday, January 31, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Understanding the U.S. Census

In this seminar, participants will eview the U.S. Census from its constitutional origins to its present day status as an essential tool of government social policy, and academic social science.

Thursday, January 27, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Mexican Revolution in Memory and Myth

This seminar will provide an overview of the main events and historical actors of the 1910-1920 Mexican revolution, whose official centennial will be marked in 2010. Participants will discuss the causes behind the major rebellions and their political and social consequences.

Wednesday, January 26, 2011
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Impossibility of Governing: Political Polarization and the Permanent Campaign

Why did Congress and the President struggle to cooperate across party lines during the 110th Congress (2009-2011) and why is it unlikely that things will change in the 111th Congress (2011-2013)?

Tuesday, December 7, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Paris Peace Conference, the Treaty of Versailles, and the Search for Order (Session 2)

The 1919 peace conference and treaty with Germany were controversial with contemporaries, reviled in the thirties, and disdained by many historians since.  One school of thought is that the end of the first world war (and the subsequent peace) led inexorably to the beginning of the second world war.  The peacemakers have been viewed as naive idealists or cynical realists, either too f

Friday, December 3, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
¿Cómo se forman los espacios, los colores, y los folios los sentidos poéticos en Blanco de Octavio Paz? (in Spanish)

Blanco es un poema y un artefacto que puede iniciar una discusión sobre cómo se influye la producción material del libro en los límites y posibilidades de la escritura del poeta.  Publicado en 1967, Blanco se asocia tanto con el rollo como con los movimientos artísticos del Pop Art.  Exploraremos los límenes y las libertades del libro, fuentes, colores y papel en la poesía.

Thursday, December 2, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Making of a "Good War": American Thought During WWII

This seminar will examine the varieties of American intellectual responses to WWII in the 1940s and 50s.  Seminar participants will explore how American commentators made sense of the war, justified American involvement, and likewise how the war set new terms for American self-understanding.   By looking at developments in American political thought, moral philosophy, cultural cr

Wednesday, December 1, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Paris Peace Conference, the Treaty of Versailles, and the Search for Order

The 1919 peace conference and treaty with Germany were controversial with contemporaries, reviled in the thirties, and disdained by many historians since.  One school of thought is that the end of the first world war (and the subsequent peace) led inexorably to the beginning of the second world war.  The peacemakers have been viewed as naive idealists or cynical realists, either too f

Thursday, November 18, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Remember the Ladies: Gender and Citizenship in Post-Revolutionary America

“Remember the Ladies,” Abigail Adams famously implored her husband, John, at the start of the American Revolution. “Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the Husbands. Remember all Men would be tyrants if they could.” Her appeal raises the question, what did the national founding mean for women?

Wednesday, November 17, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Women as Agents of Change in Iran's Recent Elections

Since its rise in 1979, the Islamic Republican regime in Iran has tried by various methods, ranging from encouragement to intimidation to  encourage women to  resume  their  traditional role as homemakers. Yet during last year’s presidential elections women played an active role in  demanding  greater political and civil freedoms.

Friday, November 5, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
United States in an Age of Empire (1890-1920)

Celebratory accounts of U.S. history have shied from the word “empire”, the one exception being the tendency to hold up the years around 1898 as an aberration in the longer sweep of events.

Thursday, November 4, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
United States in an Age of Empire (1890-1920) (Session 2)

Celebratory accounts of U.S. history have shied from the word “empire”, the one exception being the tendency to hold up the years around 1898 as an aberration in the longer sweep of events.

Wednesday, November 3, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The United States and the Global Human Rights Imagination

The twentieth century saw the rise of a revolutionary global human rights culture in which the emergence of transnational norms, movements and institutions held out the promise of more fully realizing human dignity and welfare in a space that transcended the local and the national.  Beginning at the turn of the century, and accelerating after 1945, rights talk exploded as states and people

Friday, October 29, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The History, Philosophy and Psychology of Monsters in the European Imagination

Real or imagined, literal or metaphorical, monsters have exerted a dread fascination on the human mind for many centuries. They attract and repel us, intrigue and terrify us, and in the process reveal something deeply important about the darker recesses of our collective psyche.

Wednesday, October 27, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Richard J. Daley: Man and Myth, Life and Legend

In this seminar, seminar participants will examine the many ways in which Richard J.

Monday, October 25, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Richard J. Daley: Man and Myth, Life and Legend

In this seminar, seminar participants will examine the many ways in which Richard J.

Friday, October 22, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Chicago's Race Riot of 1919 (Session 2)

The United States fought in World War I to make the world safe for democracy. After victory, African Americans carried on that mission at home. But the defenders of white supremacy did not make way for the rights and equalities of African Americans.

Friday, October 22, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Containing Multitudes: Walt Whitman and the Origins of /Leaves of Grass/ in the Early American Republic

In the fifteen years before the publication of /Leaves of Grass/ (1855), Walt Whitman constructed three authoritative voices by which he engaged the upheavals endemic to the Industrial Revolution. Through these public personas, found mostly in his journalism, Whitman offered remedies for American artisans who had lost their economic autonomy and status.

Monday, October 18, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Medieval Spain

Spain during the Middle Ages (c. 500-1500) represented a crossroads of religious cultures. Some historians have described this as a /convivencia/ or period of harmonious coexistence.

Monday, October 18, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Medieval Spain (Session 2)

Spain during the Middle Ages (c. 500-1500) represented a crossroads of religious cultures. Some historians have described this as /convivencia/ or period of harmonious coexistence.

Friday, October 15, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Chicago's Race Riot of 1919

The United States fought in World War I to make the world safe for democracy. After victory, African Americans carried on that mission at home. But the defenders of white supremacy did not make way for the rights and equalities of African Americans.

Wednesday, October 13, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
How /Hamlet/ Works

/Hamlet/’s impact has led one famous critic to credit its protagonist with “the invention of the human,” his psychological depths and existential struggles a model that decisively impacts all subsequent literary creation.

Wednesday, October 6, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
How /Hamlet/ Works

/Hamlet/’s impact has led one famous critic to credit its protagonist with “the invention of the human,” his psychological depths and existential struggles a model that decisively impacts all subsequent literary creation.

Tuesday, October 5, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
NTC: The Economics of Sprawl

A metropolitan area’s defining characteristic is that its structure is always changing. Do the cities of the future feature speedy mass transportation, expanded mixed-use neighborhoods, and vibrant downtowns? Do these future cities also feature increased congestion, burdensome commutes, suffocating pollution, and sharpened segregation?

Wednesday, May 26, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Cultural Pluralism and American Identity

The United States is commonly described as a nation of immigrants or as a melting pot of racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. In celebrating American pluralism, we rarely think about its origins or its contested history.

Tuesday, May 25, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Dissimulation, Memory, and Storytelling in Homer's /Odyssey/ (Session 2)

Students new to the /Odyssey/ sometimes find disappointing the relative absence of the kind of psychological realism we find in novels, and leave the poem with a secure sense of Odysseus’s wanderings but a suspicion that the Homeric notion of character doesn’t extend much past its famous epithets.

Monday, May 24, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Chicago's Literary Journalism (Session 2)

The image of Chicago has been created through many genres and media: poetry, fiction, drama, film.  But what all of these representations of the city have in common is a source, Chicago journalism.  Beyond this, however, many Chicago journalists have themselves written work for Chicago newspapers which transcend the limitations of the deadline-driven prose daily papers require. 

Friday, May 21, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Buddhism: Religion, Philosophy, and Culture (Session 2)

Buddhism is alternately described as a religion, a philosophy, and a culture. All of which are accurate descriptions. But tremendous confusion exists in the West about the beliefs and the logic of Buddhism.

Thursday, May 20, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Race, Place and Assimilation in America’s Melting Pot Suburbs

One of the most striking indicators of our new multiracial age is the growing racial and ethnic diversity of American suburbs. Suburbs are no longer the exclusively white enclaves that they were during the early post World-War II period, when developments such as Levittown established their racially homogeneous image for a generation.

Wednesday, May 19, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Origins of the First World War

This seminar is an intense examination of some of the events that led to the first world war and its subsequent interpretation by historians.

Monday, April 12, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
David Hume and the Enlightenment

The Scottish philosopher, essayist and historian, David Hume, was among the first great thinkers of the Enlightenment, and among the first to develop a thoroughly secular account of morality – an account that continues to be a live option.  In this seminar participants will read selections from Hume’s short work, /An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals/, and will scruti

Friday, March 12, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Anti-Intellectualism in American History (Session 2)

Throughout U.S. history, a persistent question has vexed commentators on American culture: do we have a vital, distinct intellectual life?

Monday, March 8, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Graphic Novels in the Language Arts Classroom (Session 2)

One of the key challenges in teaching graphic narratives is convincing readers that a text that looks every bit like a simple comic requires more than minimal analysis and critical reading. Thoroughly understanding a graphic narrative means developing literacies that make sense of both visual and textual elements on a page.

Friday, March 5, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Chicago's Race Riot of 1919

The United States fought in World War I to make the world safe for democracy. After victory, African Americans carried on that mission at home. But the defenders of white supremacy did not make way for the rights and equalities of African Americans.

Thursday, March 4, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Financial Crises and Recessions

Why do recessions and financial crises occur?  How can individuals and governments limit damage and reduce suffering while promoting recovery? In this seminar, participants will examine the principles of business cycles and financial crises.  An overview of several hundred years of past financial crises in the U.S.

Wednesday, March 3, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Rise and Fall of Communism in Eastern Europe, 1944-1989 (Session 2)

In the summer of 1944, the Red Army entered Eastern Europe in its westward push towards Berlin.  The Soviets liberated these territories from the Nazi occupation, but did not leave them.  Instead, with the help of local communists, they implemented the communist system patterned on the Soviet model.  By the late 1970s, the Soviet model began to break apart, only to collapse in th

Tuesday, March 2, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Age of Jim Crow: Legal Segregation by Race in the United States, 1890-1967

This seminar focuses on the role of law in creating and maintaining legal segregation in the American South from the late 19th century through the 20th century. Participants will discuss school segregation and desegration, intermarriage and fears about racial purity, as well as the complex interplay of race, gender, and class politics.

Friday, February 26, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Toni Morrison’s /Beloved/ and the American Gothic

Although originating in Britain, the gothic has taken root in American literature with fiction that explores the dark and hidden sides of human culture, creating worlds teeming with the buried, the undead, the supernatural, the forbidden, the demonic, and the grotesque.

Friday, February 26, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Walter Reuther's American Dream: The Rise and Fall of the United Automobile Workers in the Postwar United States

After the Second World War, the American labor movement worked to ensure that America’s working class benefited from the United States’ new global preeminence.

Thursday, February 25, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Toni Morrison’s /Beloved/ and the American Gothic

Although originating in Britain, the gothic has taken root in American literature with fiction that explores the dark and hidden sides of human culture, creating worlds teeming with the buried, the undead, the supernatural, the forbidden, the demonic, and the grotesque.

Wednesday, February 24, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
La reine Marguerite de Navarre: vie et écriture à la féminine à la Renaissance

Marguerite de Navarre était la soeur du roi François Ier aussi bien que reine du royaume de Navarre.  Très croyante, elle a encouragé la réforme à l’intérieur de l’église catholique en France.  Elle a écrit de la poésie spirituelle aussi bien qu’un recueil de 73 nouvelles intitulé l’/Heptaméron/.  Dans ce séminaire nous étudierons un choix de nouvelles, pour voir ce que ces petit

Wednesday, February 24, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The History of Financial Panics in the United States

Between 1819 and 2008, the United States has experienced six major panics - periods when stock market crashes coincided with bank failures.  This seminar will examine historical explanations for these panics as well as their political, social, and cultural legacies. The panic of 1819 for example, helped bring about the first popular party system.

Tuesday, February 23, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Native American Fiction and Film

This seminar is meant to provide participants with an overview of Native American literature through a series of short readings and the discussion of the Native American film, “Smoke Signals.”  The readings have been chosen for their accessibility and for the fact that they represent some key themes that one encounters in Native American literature.  Such themes include the challenges

Thursday, February 18, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Environmental Problems and Economics

This seminar will provide an economic theoretical framework for understanding that environmental problems are often economic problems with economic solutions.  Participants will focus on the role that economic incentives play in creating environmental problems and how alterations in those incentives have the potential for solving the problems.

Thursday, February 18, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Teaching Geopolitics in an Age of Uncertainty

The teaching and practice of international relations, security, and development have long been dominated by Western–especially U.S.–theoretical paradigms. The field of international relations has long privileged ‘neorealist’ and ‘neoliberal’ perspectives in its explanation of the world. Threats to U.S.

Wednesday, February 10, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Chaucer's Storytellers: Genre and Gender Bending in the /Canterbury Tales/

As readers travel along the road to Canterbury with Chaucer’s pilgrims, they not only hear a collection of stories- both pious and irreverent-but they also meet a community of characters whose diversity spans the spectrum of medieval society, who compete with one other, trading insults as well as tales.  In this seminar, participants will read some of the greatest hits (and meet some

Wednesday, February 10, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Chicago on Screen: Moving Images and the Power of Popular Culture (Session 2)

Chicagoans and their city have played integral roles in the evolution of motion picture technology and the history of film.  As producers, distributors, writers, actors, audiences, and as backdrop and setting, the city and its residents shaped the development of the medium.  But did the medium in turn affect or reflect the city?  Can a film or television show-produced by a relati

Tuesday, February 9, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Paths To "Democracy" In Post-Communist Europe

This seminar will suggest a paradigm for thinking about democratic development in post-Communist Europe.

Tuesday, February 2, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Chicago on Screen: Moving Images and the Power of Popular Culture

Chicagoans and their city have played integral roles in the evolution of motion picture technology and the history of film.  As producers, distributors, writers, actors, audiences, and as backdrop and setting, the city and its residents shaped the development of the medium.  But did the medium in turn affect or reflect the city?  Can a film or television show-produced by a relati

Tuesday, February 2, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Citadel of the Heart: Sufi Islam in Indo-Persian Literary Culture and History

This seminar will introduce participants to some of the historical background and key concepts that have informed Indo-Persian Sufism (tasawwuf) since medieval times.  Described succinctly by one modern scholar as the “mystical dimensions of Islam,” Sufi idioms of gnostic love, spiritual intoxication, and antinomian dissent from socio-religious orthodoxies have exerted a tremendous influen

Tuesday, January 26, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Financial Crisis and the Victorian Novel

In the midst of the “shocked disbelief” exclaimed by Alan Greenspan at the global financial turmoil of 2008-09, it is easily overlooked that crisis has been an expected and regular feature of life in western capitalism at least since the Victorian period.  During that period, in particular, wide-spread concern about complex financial instruments and “fictitious capital” engaged the Victori

Thursday, January 21, 2010
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Continental Drifts: The Diasporic Cultures of North America

This seminar will offer participants a new perspective on North America as a place of constant migrations and shifting homelands.  First, the issue of non-sedentary cultures will be explored, using the concept of diaspora as a tool to understand the effects of our modern environments on space and identity. What place do we call home?

Wednesday, December 9, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Tim O'Brien's /The Things They Carried/ (Session 2)

Tim O’Brien’s /The Things They Carried/ is rapidly becoming a fixture in the American literary canon, and a standard text in American high school curricula. This seminar will discuss O’Brien’s work from formal, historical, and thematic perspectives.

Tuesday, December 8, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
America's Workers of the World: Re-Examining Labor in the the Gilded Age/Progressive Era

In this seminar, particpants will explore the variety of backgrounds and experiences of the American workers during the heyday of the industrial revolution.  Participants will begin with the racial, ethnic, and gender particularity of the workforce by region, then examine sources of industrial conflict and competing strategies hatched by the labor movement itself.  Select readings and

Thursday, December 3, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Freedom and Slavery in Nineteenth-century Brazil

Freedom and slavery in nineteenth-century Brazil were intertwined. Between the abolition of the African slave trade in 1850 and the abolition of slavery in 1888, Brazil had dimensions of both a slave society and a post-emancipation society.

Wednesday, December 2, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Anti-Intellectualism in American History

Throughout U.S. history, a persistent question has vexed commentators on American culture: do we have a vital, distinct intellectual life?

Friday, November 20, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Buddhism: Religion, Philosophy, and Culture

Buddhism is alternately described as a religion, a philosophy, and a culture. All of which are accurate descriptions. But tremendous confusion exists in the West about the beliefs and the logic of Buddhism.

Thursday, November 19, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Steampunk to Slipstream: Contemporary Trends in Fantasy and Science Fiction

Although science fiction has been a popular genre for decades, and fantasy derives from a tradition as old as literature, the past two decades have seen a dramatic blurring of the boundaries between genres, between genre and literary fiction, even between adult and young adult fiction.  This seminar will touch upon several authors representative of these trends, both in England and the U.S

Thursday, November 19, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Fitzgerald and His Contemporaries

In this seminar, participants will study the short fiction of F. Scott Fitzgerald in and around the time of The Great Gatsby, considering his reputation as a writer of popular and serious fiction with comparative reference to other prominent U.S. writers of short fiction of the time, including Dorothy Parker, Ring Lardner, and Ernest Hemingway.

Wednesday, November 18, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Bangs and Whimpers: The Two Texts of /King Lear/

In this seminar, participants will look at the two different existing texts of /King Lear/ (the Quarto and the Folio), trying to see what makes each of them unique.  The idea will not be to decide which one of them is “better,” but rather to see what Shakespeare may have been doing in revising the one version into the other (if that is what he did).  One of the assumptions of the semi

Friday, November 13, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
I Know It's Only Rock n' Roll, but I Teach It: American History and Culture through Popular Music

Even in today’s hip hop/alternative music scene, rock ‘n’ roll speaks to students. Exploring recent American cultural history through a look at rock music is therefore as much fun as it is useful. The roots of rock, the rhythms, lyrics, genres and sound technology, can all be used to teach students about US postwar history.

Friday, November 13, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The United States in an Age of Empire (1890-1920)

Celebratory accounts of U.S.

Tuesday, November 3, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Populist Movements in American History

A neglected but vital element of American political history has been populism.  This seminar will explore how populism has influenced the course of our past, from the 18th century to the present.  Participants will look at the Anti-Federalists, nineteenth-century social movements, radicals during the  Progressive Era, Joe McCarthy, the New Right, and contemporary activists rangin

Wednesday, October 28, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Tim O'Brien's /The Things They Carried/

Tim O’Brien’s /The Things They Carried/ is rapidly becoming a fixture in the American literary canon, and a standard text in American high school curricula. This seminar will discuss O’Brien’s work from formal, historical, and thematic perspectives.

Tuesday, October 20, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Graphic Novels in the Language Arts Classroom

One of the key challenges in teaching graphic narratives is convincing readers that a text that looks every bit like a simple comic requires more than minimal analysis and critical reading. Thoroughly understanding a graphic narrative means developing literacies that make sense of both visual and textual elements on a page.

Thursday, October 15, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Bringing Latin American Poetry into the United States

Everyone has heard of Pablo Neruda – not just fans of the original Spanish poems, but also readers who first encounter his work in English. How have certain writers come to be familiar names to diverse audiences, in different languages? What are some common challenges for translators presenting new Latin American poets in English – and/or bilingually – in the United States?

Wednesday, October 14, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The History of Latinos in the United States (Session 2)

This seminar will explore the diversity of Latino experiences in the United States from 1492 to the present. We will examine numerous themes, including early narratives of conquest and exploration, the nature of regional differences, and the identities that stem from locale, race mixture and racial purity in the ideologies of settler elites.

Wednesday, October 14, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Rise and Fall of Communism in Eastern Europe, 1944-1989

In the summer of 1944, the Red Army entered Eastern Europe in its westward push towards Berlin.  The Soviets liberated these territories from the Nazi occupation, but did not leave them.  Instead, with the help of local communists, they implemented the communist system patterned on the Soviet model.  By the late 1970s, the Soviet model began to break apart, only to collapse in th

Thursday, October 8, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Chicago's Literary Journalism

The image of Chicago has been created through many genres and media: poetry, fiction, drama, film.  But what all of these representations of the city have in common is a source, Chicago journalism.  Beyond this, however, many Chicago journalists have themselves written work for Chicago newspapers which transcend the limitations of the deadline-driven prose daily papers require. 

Wednesday, October 7, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
From Colony to Postcolony: The Literature of Empire and its Aftermath

In recent years the study of European colonialism has become a central component of the way one understands and explains the modern world, its globalized economic markets and ethnically diverse citizenry.

Wednesday, October 7, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The History of Latinos in the United States

This seminar will explore the diversity of Latino experiences in the United States from 1492 to the present. We will examine numerous themes, including early narratives of conquest and exploration, the nature of regional differences, and the identities that stem from locale, race mixture and racial purity in the ideologies of settler elites.

Tuesday, October 6, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Sugar and Colonialism

The story of sugar’s transformation from luxury product to uibiquitous commodity in the modern Western diet offers a rich vantage on transatlantic and world history.  It also prods students and scholars to deeper consideration of the myriad social, cultural, and economic processes within which even the most seemingly banal substances can be enmeshed.

Thursday, May 21, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Killing Will: Teaching Shakespeare without Shakespeare

Just about every year, one rogue scholar or another offers a new, or newly recycled, theory about who “really” wrote Shakespeare’s plays. This seminar opts to circumvent the authorship debates altogether by asking not  “Who wrote Shakespeare?” but “Why do we care who wrote Shakespeare?” What are the consequences of abandoning the authorship question altogether?

Thursday, May 21, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Sports, Politics, and Propaganda: The Nazi Olympics of 1936

The International Olympic Committee awarded the 1936 Olympic Games to Germany in May 1931, nearly two years before Hitler became Chancellor.

Wednesday, May 20, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
La poesía tardía de Pablo Neruda

Este seminario se trata de la poesía tardía de Neruda, especialmente los poemas menos conocidos y circulados en los estudios canónicos de Neruda.  A través de una investigación de los discursos políticos y estéticos—tan nacionales como internacionales—en los cuales Neruda está situado como embajador y como poeta, tendremos la oportunidad de evaluar y apreciar las contribuciones locales y g

Wednesday, May 20, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Middle East Politics and American Foreign Policy

The Middle East has been a central focus of American foreign policy since the end of World War II.  This seminar will examine the strategic significance of the region, its internal dynamics, and the basic outlines of American foreign policy over the past few decades.  While the first half of the seminar will concentrate on the historical context of the region, the second half will tur

Tuesday, May 19, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Entertainment and Popular Culture During the Great Depression

During the economic and social catastrophe of the Great Depression of the 1930s, most Americans changed their views of the government’s role in their lives as they supported New Deal measures to mitigate and reform the worst aspects of the crisis.  Despite this change in political and  social values, however, most historians and casual observers assume that the entertainment and popul

Monday, May 18, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade- New Perspectives on Old Debates

This seminar will focus on a phenomenon which bound together four continents, touched millions of lives, and ultimately created pathways of globalization.  The trans-Atlantic slave trade has been studied intensively for decades, but new perspectives—and perhaps more important, new sources of information—have led scholars to question much of what we thought we knew.  We will examine wh

Wednesday, May 13, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Defining and Personifying the City: Sandburg and Algren

Chicago grew from a frontier outpost to a world metropolis in a mere 60 years.  Between its 1833 incorporation and the 1893 Columbian Exposition, Chicago was transformed from a village of a few hundred on the edge of wilderness to home of the railroad, the skyscraper, the modern factory, home to a million people.  Chicago writers have worked to define this unprecedented place ever sin

Tuesday, May 12, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Conflicts of Interpretation: Who or What is Jane Eyre?

A number of prominent and conflicting interpretations of Charlotte Bronte’s/ Jane Eyre/ have emerged over the past few decades.  Originally viewed as a love story, later as a feminist manifesto, and more recently as both a colonialist and anti-colonialist allegory, the novel’s complex mediations allow for a rich variety of interpretations.  We shall try to determine both t

Friday, May 8, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee and the Civil Rights Movement

Challenging the widespread depiction of Martin Luther King as winning equal rights for African Americans is the story of SNCC, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. These black and white students risked their lives to organize black southerners and help them win their own rights.

Thursday, April 30, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The American Road Narrative and the Culture of Mobility

Viewed as everything from an extension of frontier ideology to the expression of counter culture, the road narrative genre has been an enduring and popular American cultural form.

Wednesday, April 8, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Whitman Revolution

“The attitude of great poets is to cheer up slaves and horrify despots,” Walt Whitman wrote in the Preface to the 1855 edition of Leaves of Grass, a revolutionary volume of poems that radically transformed the form and content of poetry in the United States and elsewhere.  This seminar will focus on the intersections between democratic revolution and revolutionary poetics in Whitman’s writ

Friday, March 6, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Darwin, Creationism, and the Contemporary Culture Wars

This seminar focuses on the legacy of Darwinism and the conflicts between science and religion in contemporary American culture. It will be divided roughly into two halves. First, participants will take  an “intellectual tour” of the new Creation Museum in Kentucky, as a launching pad for discussing the latest debates between evolutionists and creationists.

Wednesday, March 4, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Urban Geography: From the Scale of the Neighborhood to Global Systems of Cities

In this seminar, participants will explore the ways the geographic discipline studies the organizational components of cities (i.e. neighborhoods, business districts, and public spaces), the spatial structure of cities in a comparative sense, and systems of cities in a global context (i.e. so-called World or Global Cities, offshore banking enters, and Export-Oriented Zones).

Tuesday, March 3, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Economics, Ideology, and Government Budgets

Partisan conflict over taxes, spending, and budget deficits are increasingly major concerns as the federal debt reaches new levels every year.  Informed citizens ought to understand the ideologies that shape partisan conflict over taxes and spending.  It is also worth understanding what can and cannot be done at the beginning of a new presidential administration.  What are the pr

Thursday, February 26, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Visions of the Future: Utopias and Anti-Utopias in Early Soviet Culture

In the decade after the October Revolution of 1917, in the invigorating and alarming atmosphere of scientific, technological, and political revolutions, Russian artists and writers sought to glimpse and creatively embody the promise that the future might hold.  The world was rapidly changing, and artists did not want to lag behind.  While some wished to stand in the vanguard of revolu

Tuesday, February 24, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Cultural Pluralism and American Identity

The United States is commonly described as a nation of immigrants or as a melting pot of racial, ethnic, and cultural groups. In celebrating American pluralism, we rarely think about its origins or its contested history.

Thursday, February 19, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Romantic Monstrosity: Frankenstein and The Cenci

Mary Shelley and Percy Bysshe Shelley were both famous and infamous in their own time for their writing as well as for the lives they lived.  Today, thanks to feminist criticism in the 1970s, Mary Shelley’s novel, /Frankenstein,/ is a canonical text for any English major.  Percy Shelley, previous to 1970s always one of the “big six” Romantic (read male) poets, is perhaps himself

Wednesday, February 18, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Holbein's The Ambassadors: Iconography, and Early Modern Culture

Hans Holbein’s 1533 painting, The Ambassadors, is famed for the anamorphic skull that appears in the center foreground.  This strangely distorted death’s head is so striking, we tend to forget to look closely at the many other material objects in the painting.  Yet they also have important stories to tell, about such diverse matters as Henry VIII’s divorce, the beginnings of the Prote

Tuesday, February 17, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Milton at 401: Access and Censorship

Contrary to the image regularly purveyed in contemporary media and popular culture, the Islamicate world has, over the centuries, produced some of the most eclectic, innovative, heterogeneous, and multicultural polities the world has yet seen.  One such polity would certainly be the Mughal Empire, which ruled vast stretches of the Indian subcontinent for over three centuries (1526-1857).&n...

Wednesday, February 11, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Why the Mughals Matter: Thoughts on Tolerance and Political Islam, from Akbar to Tennyson to Thomas Friedman

Contrary to the image regularly purveyed in contemporary media and popular culture, the Islamicate world has, over the centuries, produced some of the most eclectic, innovative, heterogeneous, and multicultural polities the world has yet seen.  One such polity would certainly be the Mughal Empire, which ruled vast stretches of the Indian subcontinent for over three centuries (1526-1857).&n...

Tuesday, February 10, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Recent Trends in Civil War History

In this seminar, participants will read three pieces that either take new approaches to Civil War history, or reflect critically on the ways that historians are addressing the period. We will be interested in exploring the  innovative methodologies or theoretical approaches used by scholars to ask and answer new questions.

Friday, February 6, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Beowulf and its World

As is now well known from films, graphic novels, and the like, Beowulf, our most important Old English poem, treats a super-hero’s fights against three monsters. Often overlooked, however, are its many allusions to historical events involving pre-English peoples still living in their continental Germanic homelands.

Thursday, February 5, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Remembering Revolutionary America: History, Memory, and the Construction of National Identity

At the conclusion of the War for Independence the United States emerged as a separate political entity, but the process of forging a distinct national identity continued well beyond the Revolutionary era.  History –the events of the war, the activities of the founders, and the process of territorial expansion across the Appalachians into the interior of the continent—quickly became enshrin

Wednesday, February 4, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Rethinking the Waves of Feminism: Race and Gender in Postwar U.S. Feminism

This seminar will introduce participants to recent interpretations of the modern U.S. women’s movement that have questioned the periodization of “Second Wave” feminism as starting in the mid-1960s and suggested that women of color and working-class women played an important role in shaping feminist activism in the postwar era.

Wednesday, January 28, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Dissimulation, Memory, and Storytelling in Homer's /Odyssey/

Students new to the /Odyssey/ sometimes find disappointing the relative absence of the kind of psychological realism we find in novels, and leave the poem with a secure sense of Odysseus’s wanderings but a suspicion that the Homeric notion of character doesn’t extend much past its famous epithets.

Tuesday, January 27, 2009
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Witchcraft and Magic in Medieval Europe

While witchcraft has always been illegal, exactly what constituted magic (as opposed to science or religion or healing) was a grey area through much of the middle ages.

Tuesday, December 9, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
World War II and the Transformation of American Society (session 2)

Twentieth-Century U.S. historiography hinges on the year 1945. Everything after V-J Day is lumped together as “postwar,” while everything before it is, too often, treated merely as a prelude to the “American Century” it inaugurated.

Wednesday, December 3, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Holocaust: Why, How, and What Now?

Few areas of historical study have made such striking advances in the past two decades as the study of the Nazi regime’s attempt to eradicate the European Jews.  Yet the subject remains unfathomable to many people, and its causes and course almost literally incredible.  This seminar will explore why and how the unthinkable occurred and what implications it holds for subsequent g

Wednesday, November 19, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
World War II and the Transformation of American Society

Twentieth-Century U.S. historiography hinges on the year 1945. Everything after V-J Day is lumped together as “postwar,” while everything before it is, too often, treated merely as a prelude to the “American Century” it inaugurated.

Wednesday, November 19, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Routes of Religious and Moral Reform in the City: Chicago during the Progressive Age

We’ve heard much about Jane Addams, Florence Kelley, and the University of Chicago sociologists who broke new ground during the Progressive era with fresh approaches to social urban problems.

Tuesday, November 18, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Louis XIV: Rethinking Absolutism

Louis XIV, the Sun King, is often referred to as an absolutist monarch, in spite of the term’s anachronism. In this seminar, participants will look at a variety of sources, including excerpts from the king’s memoirs and from anti-Louis XIV treatises by Leibniz and Jurieu, in order to examine how monarchical power was viewed during the seventeenth century.

Saturday, November 15, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Human Rights and Literature in South Africa

Few would disagree that individuals are endowed with inherent human rights—but what are those rights? And howare they established, acted upon, and guaranteed? This seminar investigates the conception and history of human rights, assesses current debates in the field, and explores what literary texts have to teach us about human rights.

Friday, November 14, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Debating Jacksonian Democracy (session 2)

The Jacksonian era (1815-1848) is commonly associated with the widening of political participation, the expansion of economic opportunity, and the explosion of reform movements to improve American society.  At the same time, this era witnessed the early industrial revolution and the rise of new class conflicts, the entrenchment and expansion of slavery, and the decimation and forced reloca

Thursday, November 13, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Self-Loathing, Recrimination, and Betrayal: "Love" in Shakespeare's Sonnets

This seminar will examine the rhetorical and psychological complexities of some of Shakespeare’s sonnets.  Participants will examine how Shakespeare uses the form to get his effects (or struggles with the form to do so), while also getting some sense of the range of styles that Shakespeare employs in these extraordinary poems.

Wednesday, November 12, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Federal Reserve System, Monetary Policy, and the Boom-Bust Economy

In this seminar, participants will discuss the Federal Reserve Bank’s role in shaping monetary policies and how those policies have influenced the United States’ current economic problems.

Thursday, November 6, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Writing an American Self: Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography

In this seminar, participants will examine ways in which Benjamin Franklin crafted an identity through the recollecting and writing of his life and founded the concept of the self-made man.  Participants will also discuss how, in Franklin’s text, the genre of spiritual autobiography, which stems from St.

Tuesday, November 4, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Louis XIV: Rethinking Absolutism (session 2)

Louis XIV, the Sun King, is often referred to as an absolutist monarch, in spite of the term’s anachronism. In this seminar, participants will look at a variety of sources, including excerpts from the king’s memoirs and from anti-Louis XIV treatises by Leibniz and Jurieu, in order to examine how monarchical power was viewed during the seventeenth century.

Thursday, October 30, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
The Lives of Women in Medieval Christian Europe

Christianity in medieval Europe was characterized by an ambivalent attitude toward women: the image of Eve as the source of original sin was juxtaposed with the central role of the Virgin Mary in the salvation of mankind.

Wednesday, October 29, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Politics and Self-Knowledge in John Ford's The Searchers

The United States is not a nation like many other nations; it is not the product of a commonly occupied territory over many centuries, and after the waves of immigration in the nineteenth century, it became a polyglot “unity” of many different ethnic “unities.” This raises for it the question of the nature of the psychological basis of the claims of citizenship.

Tuesday, October 28, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Anti-Federalism and Reform Movements in American History

Most of us are well aware of the role that the Anti-Federalists played in the debate over the US Constitution. And though they failed to prevent the ratification of the Consitution, their ideas were never completely expunged from American politics.

Wednesday, October 22, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Darwin's Origin of Species

Darwin’s /Origin of Species/ is one of the most important books in science and still provides the foundation for contemporary biology.  Seminar participants will examine parts of chapters 3 and 4 of the “Origin” and the last chapter.  These will furnish a good idea of the character of the theory.  Participants will discuss how Darwin’s original conception, despite its

Tuesday, October 21, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Graphic Novels in the Language Arts Classroom (session 2)

One of the key challenges in teaching graphic narratives is convincing readers that a text that looks every bit like a simple comic requires more than minimal analysis and critical reading. Thoroughly understanding a graphic narrative means developing literacies that make sense of both visual and textual elements on a page.

Friday, October 17, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Debating Jacksonian Democracy

The Jacksonian era (1815-1848) is commonly associated with the widening of political participation, the expansion of economic opportunity, and the explosion of reform movements to improve American society.  At the same time, this era witnessed the early industrial revolution and the rise of new class conflicts, the entrenchment and expansion of slavery, and the decimation and forced reloca

Thursday, October 16, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Necessary Virtue: The Pragmatic Origins of the Cultural Revolution

The Chinese Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution (1966-1976), an event that embodied Maoism and its utopian vision,  was  unique in world history in the depth and scale of  pure destruction.  It resulted in the destruction of much of China’s cultural heritage and traditions, delay of its economical and technological development and heartbreaking tragedy for literally

Tuesday, October 14, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Graphic Novels in the Language Arts Classroom

One of the key challenges in teaching graphic narratives is convincing readers that a text that looks every bit like a simple comic requires more than minimal analysis and critical reading. Thoroughly understanding a graphic narrative means developing literacies that make sense of both visual and textual elements on a page.

Thursday, October 2, 2008
Newberry Teachers' Consortium
A More Conservative Supreme Court?

As was predictable following Senate confirmation of the two Bush appointees, the United States Supreme Court moved in an increasingly conservative direction. The Court’s decision making is largely attributable to the fact that Justice Anthony Kennedy has joined forces more often than not with the four conservative justices: John Roberts, Samuel Alito, Antonin Scalia, and Clarence Thomas.