The Hits Keep Coming | Newberry

The Hits Keep Coming

I suppose I must give credit where it is due. As far as I can tell, you did not pile up a mountain of books for the Book Fair during the three-day weekend. We did get those eight boxes of cookbooks, but the donor mailed us those, so she didn’t have much control over when they arrived. The deposit box just inside the glass doors was about two-thirds full, but that could easily have happened Friday night, when I slipped away for rest and recreation after dealing with those sixteen monster boxes filled with sociology which you sent over BEFORE the holiday.

And you have made up for it since: one small truckload, a couple of missiles (the official name for those boxes we leave by the back door), and all manner of treasures. Just on Tuesday, we found

A Candyland game. We love to see the classics. I suspect it is a fairly new edition, but have not yet checked to see if it says “Gluten-free”.

A book of poetry by a man who became a poet in response to being made a representative of the New Deal. Other people have become poets to escape their government jobs, but this fellow was sent out to the Badlands and fell so much in love with the area that he could only express it in verse. (Says here he is one of North Dakota’s greatest poets. I have not read enough in this matter to comment.)

Two rather undistinguished math books from the 1930s: the young man who owned them wrote his name in them, which was really, really nice of him. Thanks to the Nobel Committee and a little prize for Physics, his signatures are worth between half a thousand and a thousand dollars apiece.

The photograph of the young man wearing…well, it isn’t so much what he’s wearing as the fact that everyone else in the picture is looking some other direction. I would’ve thought he’d be the center of attention wearing that…and that…and especially that.

A picture book with a special chapter on “Strange and Sinister Fungi”. I have often felt this way about it, but didn’t think anybody else would come right out and admit it. The fungus that eats other fungi especially held me riveted: this was just before lunch. (Still, remember our motto: a man who studies mushrooms must be a fun guy. Thank you, thank you: I’ll be here all week, as long as I can duck faster than they can shoot.)

Sixteen boxes of hardcover mysteries, a half dozen boxes of children’s books, a box of books and magazines for the genealogist, a box of craft supplies…who asked for a box of craft supplies? Well, anyway, it’s all just the sort of things we were looking for to fill a few gaps in the collection for this July. (Craft sticks? Fifty craft sticks? In my day, we got these free all summer long, once you ate off the red ice. True: they might not be as evenly shaded as these, but that was part of the personalized fun, back in the days before these kids had to have things just as…where were we?)

All in all, it’s a pretty respectable haul. We are building to a right nice offering for our first Book Fair in the new First Floor (which is on schedule, as far as I can see.) If you can find your way to the right rooms, we’ll have a lot of treasure waiting to be discovered.

Except for the photo of the lad wearing the…anyhow, that has eBay written all over it.The Hits Keep Coming

Comments

I can't stand it anymore -- whose signatures? Or are you just trying to get me to look at math books again?
It was 1983 Nobel Laureate Subramanyan Chandrasekhar who was in Chicago in 1932 and wrote his name in these math books, WHILE, he notes, at the Yerkes Observatory. His work on black holes was pioneering, but I'm waiting for the physicist who finds a way to use black holes for storing books.

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