Calendar

E.g., 10/31/2014
E.g., 10/31/2014
Monday, November 3, 2014
The Mexican Revolution and Its Legacy

9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Wait list only

This seminar will take stock of the Mexican Revolution more than a century after its outbreak in 1910. Traditional histories tell a story of rough-hewn revolutionaries like Pancho Villa and Emiliano Zapata raising armies of peasant warriors to overthrow the dictator Porfirio Díaz in a bid for social justice and national honor. But how accurate is that version?

Wednesday, November 5, 2014
Challenges Facing Russia and Ukraine in the 21st Century

9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Wait list only

This seminar will build on a historical perspective on the problems facing countries with a post-Communist legacy and will turn to the contemporary internal and external challenges of political control, economic development, and societal management.

Friday, November 7, 2014
An Analysis of the 2014 Mid-Term Elections : What it Means for the Nation, Illinois, and Chicago

9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Mid-term elections in a President’s second term usually do not bode well for the incumbent’s party (the exception: Bill Clinton in 1998). In 2014 the Republicans are making an all out effort to take over the US Senate—they need six pickups.

Monday, November 17, 2014
The First World War : The Significance of the "Great War" Then and 100 Years Later (first session)

9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Wait list only

“The war to make the world safe for democracy,” “the war to end all wars,” and “the great war.” All these phrases were used to describe the First World War until Europe experienced the rise of dictatorships of the right and the left, and a second world war occurred which was greater in magnitude and destruction.

Tuesday, November 18, 2014
Sandburg to Brooks to Dybek : Identity, the City, and Nature in Chicago Poetry

9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Wait list only

When Americans think about Nature, we tend to sort the world into “wilderness” and “the city.” Nature is beautiful, the city is ugly. Nature is life-enhancing, the city is a moral threat. The built environment is thought to oppose or contradict or ruin the natural world, no matter how many parks and beaches we also build into our cities. But how do Chicago poets see this relationship?

Wednesday, November 19, 2014
"New" Immigrant Fiction

9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Wait list only

Historians generally recognize two landmarks in US twentieth-century immigration policy: the Johnson-Reed Act of 1924, which restricted immigration from southern and eastern Europe; and the Hart-Cellar Act of 1965, which did away with national-origins quotas and opened up immigration from Asia and Latin America in unprecedented numbers.