September 2014

Wednesday, September 3, 2014
The Newberry Colloquium : Marsilio Ficino: Magician or Philosopher?

4 pm

The Newberry Library and Northwestern University recently acquired a manuscript in Italian from the late fifteenth century of Marsilio Ficino’s Opinions of the Philosophers on God and the Soul. Ficino is now known for translating into Latin the works of Plato and re-introducing neo-Platonism to European philosophy.

Saturday, September 6, 2014
A Morning with Dr. David McDonald, CG : Newberry Fall Genealogy Workshop

9:30 am - 12:45 pm

Join us for a morning with Dr. David McDonald, CG. Dave has nearly 40 years’ genealogical research experience and has more than 30 years’ experience as a lecturer and teacher in the field. Dave’s formative years were spent in Buffalo Grove and he has been a frequent user of the Newberry’s collections since 1979.

Saturday, September 6, 2014
Genealogy and Local History Orientation

9:30 am

The Genealogy and Local History staff will introduce visitors to the Newberry and explain how to use its collections at an informal orientation and tour. This month the orientation will be abbreviated due to the Fall Genealogy Workshop. Reservations not required. Free.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014
The Newberry Colloquium : Knowledge and Technology: From Socrates to the Digital Age

4 pm

The subject of this year’s undergraduate Humanities seminar (sponsored by the Associated Colleges of the Midwest) converges on the themes of knowledge and technology. Who produces knowledge? How is it organized? Who has access to it?

Tuesday, September 16, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Upstate–Downstate: Chicago in Illinois, the Midwest, and the World

5:45 - 7:45 pm

This discussion-based seminar will survey the “Upstate-Downstate” divide in Illinois history. Is it a reality? If so, how powerful is the trope? If mythical, what undermines the idea? If half true, what topics transcend the divide?

Tuesday, September 16, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
The First World War, 1914–1918

1 - 3 pm - OR - 5:45 - 7:45 pm

Both sections of this class are full. Registration has closed.

Note: There are two sessions of this class to accommodate demand. They both have the same content.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Great Orchestra Works from Bach to Stravinsky

2 - 4 pm

Join us as we recognize and explore pieces of music overlooked in the mainstream symphony circuit. Participants will gain an in-depth understanding and appreciation for works such as Bach’s Orchestral Suites, Liszt’s Dante Symphony, and Stravinsky’s Petroushka.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
The French Correction: A Relaxed Approach To Le français

5:45 - 7:45 pm

Would you like to try a laid-back and enjoyable way to start studying French or to improve your French pronunciation? This course, intended for participants at any level of proficiency, uses an accepting classroom atmosphere and the vocabulary of fine food and wine to help you decode the French spelling system and pronounce French more easily and accurately.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Music Appreciation through Performance: A Chamber Ensemble

5:45 - 7:45 pm

New schedule and new price!

Note: the length of the course has been shortened to 10 weeks. Schedule information in the printed brochure is no longer accurate.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
The Lincoln-Douglas Debates

5:45 - 7:45 pm

In 1858 Stephen A. Douglas and Abraham Lincoln, fighting for the Illinois senate seat then held by Douglas, met in seven debates. Focused on the question of slavery and its extension into the western territories, these “joint discussions” went to the very heart of American society and government.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Picturing the Great War: Conflict, Representation, and Memory in American Visual Culture

6 - 7:30 pm

American society and culture underwent profound transformations in the wake of the unprecedented violence, loss, and trauma of World War I.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Moral Philosophy 101: Aristotle’s Nichomachean Ethics

2 - 4 pm

Aristotle’s Nichomachean Ethics is one of the most influential textbooks of moral philosophy ever written. Celebrated in antiquity, canonized in the Middle Ages, and widely rejected in the Early Modern period, Aristotle’s ethical theory is undergoing a resurgence today.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
The Rise and Fall of Ancient Maya Civilization: A Comparative Perspective

2 - 4 pm

Of all the pre-Hispanic civilizations of the New World, the Maya inspire a particular fascination for scholars, artists, and the public. How did they achieve such splendor in the inhospitable rain forest and why did their civilization collapse from such heights?

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
The Hobbit: J.R.R. Tolkien's Mythic Sources

5:45 - 7:45 pm

Discover the roots of The Hobbit in Norse mythology, German legend, and English literature. Participants will read J.R.R. Tolkien’s classic novel in detail as they explore ancient poems and tales of wizards and wanderers, dwarves and dragons, heroes and hoards.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014 to Saturday, January 3, 2015
Chicago, Europe, and the Great War

In the fall of 2014, the Newberry will mark the centennial of the start of World War I with two linked exhibitions and a series of related public programs.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
The Lost Region: Toward a Revival of Midwestern History : A Meet the Author Event

6 pm

In comparison to the South, the far West, and New England, the history of the Midwest has been sadly neglected. In addition to outlining the centrality of the Midwest to crucial moments in American history, Jon K. Lauck resurrects the long-forgotten stories of the institutions founded by an earlier generation of midwestern historians.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Medieval Britain 1066-1307 through Historical Fiction

5:45 - 7:45 pm

Explore the highlights of Medieval British history– including the Norman Conquest, the Anarchy, the Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland, and the Conquest of Wales–through quality historical fiction. Novels by Morgan Llywelyn, Sharon Penman, and others will introduce the period.

Thursday, September 18, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
It Didn't All Go Up in Flames: Exploring Pre-Fire Chicago at the Newberry

5:45 - 7:45 pm

Worried that the Fire burned your chances of discovering what Chicago was like in its early days? Think again! Join us as we explore a gold mine of pre-Fire treasures, many drawn from the Newberry’s collections, including maps, diaries, church records, newspapers, and sheet music.

Thursday, September 18, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Twentieth Century Classical Music: Evolution, Revolution, or Bust

2 - 4 pm

Was the twentieth century a musical wasteland from which emerged a plethora of inspired ideas but only a few that can stand the test of time? Or was it a wonderland of new sounds and images that have inspired and enriched the music of today?

Thursday, September 18, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
No Exit for Art: European Drama, 1906-1968

6 - 7:30 pm

This lecture and discussion-based seminar will examine the rich period of European theater from the first half of the twentieth century.

Saturday, September 20, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
The Source Of Stories: Writing From Your Experience and Imagination

10 am – Noon

Writing begins with you. In this workshop we will learn how to organize our lives and our writing as well as reach into our own experiences and imaginations to produce stories of any length. Through a step-by-step process, we will explore where stories come from, how to begin them, and how to tell them.

Saturday, September 20, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Victoria and Edward VII: The British Monarchy, 1837–1910

10 am - Noon

The Victorian and Edwardian periods encompassed enormous social, political, and cultural changes.

Saturday, September 20, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Inanna: Sumeria's Erotic Goddess, and Solomon's Song

 1 – 3 pm

Inanna’s story may be the oldest on earth. In it, the goddess copes with a serpent-infested tree, tricks the god of wisdom, builds human civilization, delights in extravagant sexual joy, and descends to the underworld.

Saturday, September 20, 2014
George Kennan and American Diplomacy

9 am - 4 pm

The short book American Diplomacy, 1900–1950 by the late scholar-diplomat George F. Kennan, is an unusual classic: a critique of US foreign policy widely used in the training of american diplomats. Participants will discuss this text and and assess whether there is a place in the foreign policy of a democracy for Kennan’s “realist” style of dispassionate analysis.

Saturday, September 20, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Dostoevsky's The Gambler and The Idiot

10 am - Noon (Morning session) OR 1 - 3 pm (Afternoon session)

Note: There are two sessions of this class to accommodate demand. They both have the same content.

Saturday, September 20, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Shakespeare's Wars of the Roses Power, Action and Conflict

1 - 3 pm

Shakespeare populates his Wars of the Roses plays with vividly drawn characters who use their power to take actions against opposing forces. We will focus our attention on these complex indivudals by studying, viewing, and discussing nine important characters from Shakespeare’s first tetralogy (Henry VI, Parts 1, 2, 3 and Richard III).

Tuesday, September 23, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
How War Changed Women: Perspectives on British Life, Fiction, and Fashion during World War I

5:45 - 7:45 pm

This class is full and registration has closed.

This seminar considers the lives of British women from the years leading up to the Great War through its aftermath (1910–1925). As women coped with wartime, they forged and expressed new identities through memoirs, novels, imagery, and dress.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Tales of the Jazz Age

6 - 7:30 pm

Although it was a short period in American culture, the Jazz Age (1919–1929) continues to attract and excite students of American literature and history. We will read literature from Lost Generation and Harlem Renaissance writers to better understand the thrall and significance of the era. In addition to critical articles and essays, we will read This Side of Paradise by F.

Thursday, September 25, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Writing the City

5:45 - 7:45 pm

This workshop will give Chicagoans the chance to capture the essence of their city in words. Using personal essays, blog posts, opinion pieces, and short memoirs, we will write about those aspects of urban living that most captivate us: the rich and varied cultural offerings; the architecture, community gardens, and green spaces; our vast network of vibrant and struggling neighborhoods.

Thursday, September 25, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
The Beat Goes On: Writing Poetry in Meter and Form

2 - 4 pm

Have you ever wanted to write iambic meter after reading Shakespeare? Has a poem in Poetry magazine surprised you by being formal and colloquial? Maybe you are already writing in meter and rhyme but want to know more about how today’s poets use forms such as iambs, trochees, and dactyls?

Thursday, September 25, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Queen of Instruments: The Violin and Its Music

2 - 4 pm

Traceable to the harp and lyre of antiquity, as well as to the medieval fiddle, the violin began to acquire its present shape and character in the seventeenth century. At first it was an ensemble instrument, but its possibilities as a solo instrument were soon recognized.

Saturday, September 27, 2014
Finding Your Voice, Telling Your Stories

10 am - 4 pm

This workshop is designed for journal writers, people writing family stories, and creative writers who want to record their life stories–those significant tales of transition, adventure, loss, and triumph. We will use a series of writing exercises to retrieve and record the important people, places, and events in our lives.

Saturday, September 27, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
The Elements of Creative Writing

1 – 3 pm

Suspense and conflict, figures of speech and points of view, setting and scene, history and invention, diction and dialogue, plot and theme, line breaks and stanzas: these are just some of the elements of creative writing. This supportive yet challenging workshop will provide weekly assignments to help writers at all levels and in every genre master these principles.

Saturday, September 27, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Louis XIV, His Court, and Seventeenth–Century France

1 - 3 pm

This course offers a well-rounded introduction to Louis XIV’s energetic and complex personality, his complicated love-life, his sophisticated political skills, and his accomplishments in the expansion and modernization of France. Nancy Mitford’s deeply researched The Sun King and W. H.

Saturday, September 27, 2014
The Map Thief: The Gripping Story of an Esteemed Rare-Map Dealer Who Made Millions Stealing Priceless Maps : A Meet the Author Event

1 pm

Maps have long exerted a special fascination—as beautiful works of art and as practical navigational tools. But to those who collect them, the map trade can be a cutthroat business, inhabited by quirky and sometimes disreputable characters in search of a finite number of extremely rare objects. Once considered a respectable antiquarian map dealer, E.

Tuesday, September 30, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Marcel Proust's The Guermantes Way

6 - 7:30 pm

The third volume of In Search of Lost Time, Proust’s monumental novel, is a dazzling portrait of the salon society of late nineteenth-century Paris rendered in loving detail even as it is ruthlessly satirized. The narrator discovers the shallowness of a world he had mythologized as a boy in Combray.

Tuesday, September 30, 2014
Conversations at the Newberry: Neil Steinberg and Thomas Dyja Discuss Chicago as the Second City

6 pm

Responding to a canon of criticism of Chicago that dates back at least to the mid-twentieth century (and a recent contribution to which came from Rachel Shteir in the New York Times), Thomas Dyja, author of Third Coast, and Neil Steinberg, author of You Were Never in Chicago, will debate Chicago as the Second City and its place in American history and culture.

Tuesday, September 30, 2014
(This program continues for multiple sessions)
Late Romanticism: Bridge to the Twentieth Century and Modern Music

2 - 4 pm

The generation of composers born in the 1860s and 70s contributed to the evolutionary process of classical music by pushing the limits of the traditional concepts of form, harmony, rhythm, and even melody. Compositions were inspired by extra-musical content including literary elements, autobiography, sensual intoxication, and “nature” pictures.