Blogs at the Newberry

The Newberry has a variety of blogs, which reflect the diversity of our collections and our staff.

Every book has a story
Book Fair Blog
Check in frequently to read the behind-the-scenes scoop on the Newberry's popular Book Fair. The blog is maintained by "Uncle Blogsy," otherwise known as Dan Crawford, Book Fair Manager.
John Scottowe. Letter "I" from "Calligraphic Alphabet," 1592. Wing MS ZW 545 .S431.
Center for Renaissance Studies Blog
Welcome to the blog for the Newberry Center for Renaissance Studies! We post about center programs; items in the Newberry collections of special interest to those involved in medieval, Renaissance, or early modern studies; and profiles of scholars coming to the Newberry to present talks or pursue their research in those areas of study. We welcome your comments.
Illustration by Tom Bachtell
Dear Walter
Dear Reader, Please send your Missives and Queries regarding the Newberry, the Humanities, or this season of Modern Existence generally construed. I shall have my intern-amanuensis, Henry, submit my Reply with a haste that would shame Atalanta. I may be reached, through the ghostly conduit you call “EMAIL,” at dearwalter@newberry.org, or through recourse to a special "WEBFORM." Sincerely yours, Walter L. Newberry
Genealogical Roll of the Kings of England and Dukes of Bourbon. c.1465. Newberr
Genealogy Blog
Upcoming genealogy events, new resources, research tips, and other information from Newberry Reference and Genealogy Services. 

Project blogging

Exploring Printing History at the Newberry: Sharing notable discoveries during the cataloging and processing of more than 29,000 printing specimens from the seventeenth century to the present. These items belong to the Newberry's John M. Wing Foundation. The 2.5-year project is part of a national effort administered by the Council on Library and Information Resources, with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Recent posts from the Newberry blogs

Monday, March 30, 2015

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Women’s History Month: Women’s Honor in the Medieval AgesLe Champion des Dames is a long, allegorical poem that defends the honor and reputation of women. Martin le Franc wrote the poem in Middle French between 1440 and 1442. The Newberry’s...

Sunday, March 29, 2015

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The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan DoyleThis publicity poster from 1901 announced the publication in Strand magazine of The Hound of the Baskervilles, a Sherlock Holmes story by Arthur Conan Doyle. The story first appeared in...

Saturday, March 28, 2015

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This photo of the Hermon Dunlap Smith Exhibit Gallery was taken by Charles Derus.The Newberry’s photogenic architecture, reading rooms, and staff brought the “Chicago Streets and Beyond” photography “Meetup” group to the library on Saturday,...

Friday, March 27, 2015

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Women’s History Month: Mary Queen of ScotsMary Queen of Scots (1542-1587), Queen Elizabeth’s greatest rival, became queen of Scots when only six days old. Throughout her youth, Scotland was ruled by regents, including her mother, Mary of Guise....

Friday, March 27, 2015

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Women’s History Month: Thamyris with the head of Cyrus the Great Le Miroir de Humaine Saluation, or The Mirror of Human Salvation, is an illuminated manuscript from Flanders that dates to approximately 1455. Illuminated manuscripts are richly...

Friday, March 27, 2015

I wonder why the Book Fair doesn’t get more Avalon Hill games. Maybe it’s a cultural thing: our chief audience doesn’t seem terribly math-oriented.

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Posted in: Genealogy Blog

Abraham, Carolyn. The Juggler’s Children.: A Family History Gene By Gene. Toronto  Random House Of Canada, Limited 2013. (Call # On-order)

Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Not everyone who writes in a book is inscribing it as a gift. This job is not ALL “To Snooky-Ookums from Muppet T-Shirt.” Books in languages other than English are prone to have the new words underlined, with translations in the margin. Plays often...

Monday, March 23, 2015

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This 1540 edition of Claudius Ptolemy’s Geographia universalis visualizes the dangers of the sea that many Renaissance maps just imply with their less violent sea monsters. #mapmonstermonday

Monday, March 23, 2015

One of the talents required of the overworked Book Fair manager is the ability to become an instant expert. In the days before the Internet, this sometimes involved writing letters or consulting esoteric reference books. Thanks to the free exchange...