American Indian and Indigenous Studies Seminar Series | Newberry

American Indian and Indigenous Studies Seminar Series

Black Horse Ledger. ca. 1877-79. Edward E. Ayer Art Collection Oversize Ayer MS 3227.

Black Horse Ledger. ca. 1877-79. Edward E. Ayer Art Collection Oversize Ayer MS 3227.

The D’Arcy McNickle Center launched the Seminar Series in American Indian and Indigenous Studies in the fall 2008. The seminars feature scholarly discussion of papers based on work in progress. Faculty, graduate students, and independent scholars are encouraged to attend and to circulate news of this forum to colleagues.

Registration Information

Seminar sessions are held on the first Thursday of the month from 5:30 - 7 pm at the Newberry, 60 West Walton Street, Chicago, Illinois. We will pre-circulate papers to those planning to attend. If you cannot attend and want to read a paper, please contact the author directly. To receive a copy of a paper, email rochfordp@newberry.org or call (312) 255-3552. Papers are available for request two weeks prior to the seminar date. Please include your email address in all correspondence.

The seminar format assumes that participants have read the essays in advance, and that those requesting the paper will attend. Please do not request a paper unless you plan to attend. We encourage faculty members to invite their graduate students to attend.

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Past American Indian Studies Seminars

Seminar Schedule

Thursday, February 14, 2019
American Indian Studies Seminar Series
Native women are overwhelmingly ignored in research on gender-based violence. Native women residing in urban locales are particularly marginalized, as they are viewed as “less Native” by both non-Native researchers and at times by Native people living on reservation lands.
Thursday, March 7, 2019
American Indian Studies Seminar Series
This presentation, a dissertation chapter-in-progress, compares Hopi ideas about preservation with reigning best practices in language revitalization initiatives and archival practice.
Thursday, April 4, 2019
American Indian Studies Seminar Series
After a decade marked by the 1973 Occupation of Wounded Knee and the creation of the International Indian Treaty Council, U.S.-based Indigenous activists 1980s found themselves in a difficult position.
Thursday, May 2, 2019
American Indian Studies Seminar Series
Native American women from the American Southwest have always used basket weaving to maintain relationships with nature, their spirituality, tribal histories, sovereignty, and their ancestors.
Thursday, May 2, 2019
American Indian Studies Seminar Series
Among the vast assortment of objects preserved at Harvard University’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology rests a collection of medicinal plant samples acquired by early twentieth-century anthropologist Mark Raymond Harrington.