National Security and the Constitution

Newberry Teachers' Consortium
Thursday, October 17, 2013

9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Full, wait list only
Dr. David Barnum, DePaul University

This seminar will explore how the United States Constitution allocates governmental responsibility for protecting national security, that is, for the conduct of foreign affairs and the use of military force. Everyone agrees that the text of the Constitution does not fully or accurately describe the way in which the government exercises its foreign affairs and war powers. In particular, both the United States and the international environment in which it operates have changed in dramatic and fundamental ways since the adoption of the Constitution. The Constitution is still “the supreme Law of the Land,” however, and no participant in any of the modern debates about foreign affairs and the use of military force fails to cite the Constitution in presenting and defending his or her position. This seminar will discuss ways in which the Constitution provides an appropriate point of departure for any discussion of the federal government’s fulfilment of its responsibilities for protecting national security.

Cost and registration information: 

Registration opens September 4, 2013.

For registration information please contact Charlotte Wolfe Ross at wolfec@newberry.org

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