Have We Missed the Boat?

"The manner of makinge their boates" by Theodor de Bry after a John White watercolor. Native Americans make a dugout canoe with seashell scrapers. 1590
"The manner of makinge their boates" by Theodor de Bry after a John White watercolor. Native Americans make a dugout canoe with seashell scrapers. 1590
Dugout Canoes in the Mississippi Valley
Center for American Indian Studies Programs
American Indian Studies Seminar Series
Wednesday, February 26, 2014

5:30 pm to 6:30 pm

TFL

Peter H. Wood, Emeritus Professor of History, Duke University

We know far more about the iconic birch bark canoe than we do about the large wooden dugout canoes that were central to Native American life along vast sections of the Mississippi and Missouri rivers at the time of European contact, and for many centuries before that. This paper explores how and why we have “missed the boat.” The suggested answers re-open a somewhat neglected chapter in the history of the vast river basin, its huge river-bottom trees (that have been gone for several centuries), and the transportation achievements of generations of indigenous residents of the North American interior.

Cost and registration information: 

AIS seminar papers are pre-circulated electronically two weeks prior to the seminar date. Email mcnickle@newberry.org to request a copy of the paper. Please do not request a paper unless you plan to attend.