Graduate Seminar: Literacy and Orality in Medieval Culture and Society

Bonaventura da Brescia, Regula musice venerabilis
Bonaventura da Brescia, Regula musice venerabilis Fratris Bon Auenture de Brixia Ordinis Minorum. 1518. Case 3A 725.
Center for Renaissance Studies Programs
Graduate Seminar
Thursday, January 5, 2012 to Thursday, March 8, 2012

2 - 5 pm on ten consecutive Thursdays

Karen Scott, DePaul University

The seminar will explore some of the ways literate and oral/aural modes of knowing and communicating affected the development of ideas and social practices in the central and late Middle Ages. Topics will include Latin and vernacular literacy in such settings as the monastery, the court, the government archive, the school, and the church; and the mix of oral and literate cultures involved in a variety of sources, including epic and courtly literature, charters, sermons, visionary texts, hagiography, and letters.

Students will also examine manuscripts and early printed books from the Newberry collections for evidence of how they were put together, who owned them, and how they were used.

Participants: Emanuela Carney, University of Illinois at Chicago; Jennifer Frey, Loyola University Chicago; Justin Hastings, Loyola University Chicago; Andrew Hill, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Brandon Pearce, Western Michigan University; Rebecca Richardson Mouser, University of Missouri; Dmitri Sandbeck, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Greta Smith, Miami University; Sarah Weisweaver, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; and Zachary Wendler, Northern Illinois University.

Faculty and graduate students of Center for Renaissance Studies consortium institutions may be eligible to apply for travel funds to attend CRS programs or to do research at the Newberry Library. Each member university sets its own policies and deadlines; contact your Representative Council member in advance for details.

Learn more about Center for Renaissance Studies programs for graduate students.

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